RGB or S-Video

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by MatthewKolden, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. MatthewKolden

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    I can't tell whether my PS2 picture looks better with RGB or S-Video. Does anyone have any experience with this that could give me some insight as to what to look for?
     
  2. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    RGB? How do you have it connected? Do you mean component video? I'm unfamiliar with the PS2 hardware but I don't recall it having a computer DSub-15 RGB connection.
     
  3. Ken Chui

    Ken Chui Supporting Actor

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    Are you looking for screenshot comparisons such as this?
     
  4. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    So then component, not RGB. Component should give you the better picture over S-Video. If not there is likely something wrong with your cables or TV inputs. S-Video separates the video bandwidth into chroma (color) and luminance (black and white). The compromise here is that because the color is clumped together the TV's decoder needs to do more work to separate the components and send to the appropriate CRT. Component video separates the color signals further into red (Pr) and blue (Pb) with the luminance signal Y. The decoder then needs only to apply some math to find the difference between the total color signal and red and blue to determine green. As such you will also hear component video refered to as "color difference". Because of the greater degree of video separation you should expect to see richer, more natural color than with S-Video. A component connection is also the only way you will be able to feed a progressive scan signal. S-Video will always be interlaced.
     

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