RG6 Quad Shield?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Brad Stop, Nov 17, 2003.

  1. Brad Stop

    Brad Stop Auditioning

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    I'm running new coax through my house starting with an indoor run to the roof to connect to an outdoor antenna to receive HDTV, UHF, VHF, FM. I may want to convert this to satelite in the future.

    I have heard that the Belden 1694A is a good performing cable. I believe this isn't a quad-shield cable. I have searched other posts and read that you would want quad-shield if you live near a tower (which is not my case). Are there any other reasons for a quad-shield coax. Will it cut down on interfernce from or to other electronics in my home? If quad-shield is important, are there any other brand recommendations for a good quality cable?

    What type of F-connectors are good? Should I go with a crimped or screw on version? I don't mind investing in a decent crimp tool, but I don't want to spend $80 either. Any advice on whose connectors and crimp tools to use?
     
  2. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Brad, it's the amount of shielding provided that counts - not just if its quad shielded. The Belden cable - 1694A - provides two shield layers, one spec'ed at 100 percent and another at 95 percent.

    As for connectors, I bought into the Canare solution mostly because I really suck at stripping cable and doing connectors and liked their complete solution but for the Parts Express crimp tool, Canare die and the Canare stripper, it wasn't cheap ($140). This will put you over the $80 threshold unfortunately [​IMG] You may want to visit Belden's site to see what connectors are compatible with 1694A.

    cheers,


    --tom
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Brad,

    As you’ve already found in other posts, there’s no good reason to use quad shield unless you live near a tower. It best use is in places where the RFI is especially strong – like near a tower. It isn’t going reduce interference from your other electronics anymore than regular RG-6 – that is, unless you have some broadcasting equipment... [​IMG]

    As far as F-connectors, if you aren’t going to invest in the proper tools ($50 entry-level for a good ratcheting-type F-crimper) then go with the twist-ons. They aren’t the best option for situations where equipment is taken in and out a lot, but for “hook it up and forget about it” installations they work fine – if you install them right. Sure, the twist-on F-connectors are much more expensive than crimp-ons, but they makes more sense than springing for specialty tools that you may hardly ever use.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Brad Stop

    Brad Stop Auditioning

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    Tom & Wayne,
    Thanks for your prompt replies and education on shielding. Since I'm unlikely to start a career in broadcasting, I think I'll stick with the 1694A.

    As to the connectors, a little more homework may be in order. I'm a tool junkie, but as you said spring for $140 tool is a little much for a few uses. If I decide to go with a crimp style, how is Ideal tool or any of the Parts Express crimpers (#360-046, #360-044, 360-048 or 360-680?

    I checked the Belden recommendations it appears from my lay perspective that the 1694A accepts a standard RG6 connector. Has anyone tried the PE #092-491? How about the slick Zenith (didn't think I'd ever say that) connects at Lowe's?
     
  5. Rob Ritch

    Rob Ritch Agent

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    Brad,

    another option is the snap-n-seal connectors. We used those exclusively in the head-end when I worked for Comcast. these connectors slip over the cable and use a compression fitting that is pushed in between the connector and the fitting. They are easy to use and I have never seen one fail. Check www.anixter.com they should have the cable prep tool and the fitting tool. I recently purchased the tools and 100 fitting for around $150 if I remember correctly
     
  6. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Brad,

    One of the advantages if you do get some nice tools is that you can make your own patch/interconnect cables later on using the 1694A and all you'll need is the cost of the connectors. I'd agree with Wayne that the cheaper crimp tools aren't really worth it. As mentioned, I've sucked at doing these things in the past - back when I tried a cheap crimp tool from Home Depot along with the Ideal crimp-on connectors. I had better luck with the twist ons as I later learned. I've only invested in the better tools and connectors since I want to rewire my whole house and replace all the hodgepodge of RG59 patch cables I have with some decent cable. It's up to you but if you don't want to spring for the tools just yet, I'd second the recommendation for RG6 twist-ons and see if those fit the Belden cable. I believe you're right in that the 1694A cable is pretty close to standard RG6 size.

    good luck,


    --tom
     

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