Revisits

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Brian Kissinger, Dec 26, 2002.

  1. Brian Kissinger

    Brian Kissinger Screenwriter

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    With another thread dedicated to new discoveries, I thought I'd start a thread for titles you've revisited. I received many new movies this Christmas, and thought I'd chime in on how well they've held up over time, or how much I thought of them upon a second go-round. I've watched three so far.
    Unforgiven 1992
    directed by Clint Eastwood
    This has a been an unforgettable movie to me. When I first saw this in the theaters, I came into the movie just as it was starting at the whore-house. This is a dark scene, and with the lights out in the theater, it was damn near pitch black in there. In trying to find a seat, I inadvertently started to sit on some poor woman. Right from the go, this was a Helluva movie.
    This film hasn't lost a thing. I haven't seen in for probably a good five years, but I still love it. Nothing beats Clint's cold glare and the unforgettable That's right. I killed woman and children. I've killed about everything that moves or crawls at one time. And I'm here to kill you, Little Bill. Great movie.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] 1/2
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest 1975
    directed by Milos Forman
    Jack at Jack's finest. I haven't seen this one since about 92 or so after I read the book. I loved the movie then, and I love the movie now. Louise Fletcher wasn't quite as evil as I remembered her, but then again I could be getting confused with the book. Wonderful performances by Jack and many supporting actors, including Brad Douriff in, what I believe, was his screen debut. And I managed to find another movie that I love, and my wife dislikes.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] 1/2
    Spiderman 2002
    directed by Sam Raimi
    I remember a while back when it was rumored that James Cameron was going to do this movie. Boy, was I excited. Cameron, the man who brought us Aliens and the Terminators was going to do Spiderman. Sweet! Then came all the legal hassles, and next thing you know, I lost all excitement for it. Then it's done filming, and all the hoopla and buzz begins. Mr. Raimi, one of my personal faves, had directed. And I still wasn't all that interested. Then she opened huge, and everyone was talking about it. I still wasn't all that enthused. But, I took my kids, and off we went to see Spiderman. They loved it. I, due mainly to a bad experience with unruly juveniles, wasn't quite as praising. Then we caught it again at the drive-in (not the best place for picture and sound quality, but a wonderful experience in its own). Again, I liked the film, but it didn't strike a chord with me. Then, I watched her again last night. I must say, I enjoyed it a whole lot more. I rank her up there with Batman. Could it be the "off-center" directors of these films that make them so likable to me? I'm not sure, but at any rate, I thank them.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    I saw The Phantom Menace at a theater (yes, 12:01 midnight premire showing) and I though it was just OK. I recently bought the DVD this year and I really enjoy it now.

    Superman: The Movie is one movie I remember as a child from TV showings. I never really liked it...until I saw the restored, widescreen DVD. The restored version really made the film into one of my favorites.
     
  3. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    Great idea!!!
    Glory
    directed by Edward Zwick
    [​IMG]
    - acting
    - cinematography
    - film score
    - sound
    [​IMG]
    - none
    Movie Score: A+
    Film Score: A
    Overall Score with tilt: A+
    I don't know how many times I make it a point to watch this movie over and over again. It's a lot like how people love Shawshank Redemption for its emotional impact. I love Glory for its emotional impact.
    The story is about the Massachusett's 54th, an all-black regiment commanded by Robert Gould Shaw (Matthew Broderick). Other notables include his second-in-command Major Forbes, the Sergeant Major Rawlins (Morgan Freeman), Private Trip (Denzel Washington), Private Jupiter Sharps (Jihmi Kennedy), and Colonel Thomas Searles (Andre Braugher).
    Maybe it's the film's sombre and haunting score. Maybe it's the comraderie that develops amongst the soldiers. Maybe it's the principle of fighting for what's right. Or it could be all those elements put together. Either way, this is probably one of the most moving war stories I've seen.
    As far as I'm concerned, this is the only movie I can think of that goes across the board (male/female, old/young) in which everybody leaves with a great experience.
     
  4. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Don't Look Now (1973)
    Directed by Nicholas Roeg.
    Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie are John and Laura Baxter. They have been married for years and have two children. They couldn't be happier. Then tragedy decides to enter their lives one dreary and misty day. The children are playing outside; daughter Christine is playing near a pond in her bright red cloak while son Johnny is riding his bicycle. Meanwhile, enscounced in his warm parlor, John looks over photographs of a crumbling church in Venice and chats nonchalantly with Laura. Then he notices what appears to be a splotch of blood on one of the photographs. A sense of foreboding washes over him. He runs outside and is met by the screams of his son. What is that red thing floating in the pond?
    Some time later, the couple is living in Venice where John is overseeing the restoration of an ancient church. One day at lunch, they meet two elderly sisters. One is blind but claims to have seen the Baxter's dead daughter sitting at the table with them. "She is happy," they are told. Laura is thrilled by this, but John is pragmatic and doesn't believe in the supernatural. Still, something is bothering him. Laura later visits with the sisters and returns to John with the news that Christine has returned for a reason: something terrible is going to happen...
    Don't Look Now is a moody and intriguing supernatural thriller, fluidly directed by Nicholas Roeg. Adapted from a story by Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca), this is an unsettling film that sticks with you.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Rembrandt (1936)
    Directed by Alexander Korda.
    Charles Laughton gives one of his best performances in this film biography of the great Dutch painter. Rembrandt Van Rijn is at the pinnacle of his career, enjoying the exalted status that comes with being the pre-eminent artist of his time. Then it all comes crashing down around him when Saskia, his beloved wife and muse, suddenly dies. After her death, his work becomes dark and cynical. Try as he might, he can no longer give his patrons what they want. Years later, he is near-penniless and work is hard to find. Then he notices Hendrickje, a young servant girl. His heart softened by her wide-eyed innocence, can he reclaim his lost passion?
    Rembrandt runs a brief 85 minutes. Not long enough you would think, to explore the life of one of the greatest painters in history. With such a short running time, the film does seem to be a Cliff notes version of Rembrandt's life. But it is done so well! Laughton is superb in the title role as is Elsa Lanchester (The Bride of Frankenstein) in her turn as the woman who saves Rembrandt from his despair. Special mention goes to Carl Zuckmayer's screenplay which gives Laughton some memorable speeches. Also, Vincent Korda's production design and Georges Perinal's cinematography are to die for. I love it when everything comes together in a film like this!
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  5. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    Leave it to Steve to revisit something most people have never seen. I have to admit, Don't Look Now sounds good. Besides, I can look at Julie Christie all day long and then some.


    Dome, I either didn't realize or forgot that Ed Zwick directed Glory. Even though I think he tends to lean toward style over substance, I definitely like several of his movies. One thing about style over substance is they look really good. I have to point out that Glory was shot by Freddie Francis, who is definitely one of my personal favorites.

    You might check out Dangerous Beauty, another Zwick film. It is a bit on the melodramatic side, but it stars two of my favorite actors, Rufus Sewell & Catherine McCormack and has sumptuous photography by Bojan Bazelli, who does not get nearly enough recognition.
     
  6. Justin_S

    Justin_S Producer

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    Speak for yourself, John, as I have seen, love and own the excellent DON'T LOOK NOW, which is by far one of the best horror films of the 70s, and unfortunately got overshadowed by the inferior THE EXORCIST. After your comments in the draft thread, I'm admittedly surprised you think it sounds good. :p)
    As for films I've revisited, I'll post some thought on them later today, Friday.
     
  7. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    Hey, Justin, why wouldn't I think it sounds good? I really like a good horror movie. It's just that most of them suck. Remember, I was floored by Session 9. I also like several Cronenbergs, particularly eXistenZ. Even though a lot of people don't consider it horror, it definitely do, and much better than most that comes out.



    Oh yeah, :p) right back at ya.
     
  8. Justin_S

    Justin_S Producer

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    I don't know, I guess because you said most horror films suck (which a whole lot do, but not the majority), I figured you wouldn't really think a horrorish plot would sound too appealing. Just a thought though, and I agree that SESSION 9 is wonderful, and I agree that eXistenZ is a horror film. Cronenberg is also my second favorite director of all time, and I love every film he's done, so we agree there too. We just don't agree that most horror movies suck. [​IMG]
     
  9. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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  10. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    I’ve re-watched All that Heaven Allows and Written on the Wind, after seeing the admirable homage to Sirk, Far From Heaven. I’m queuing up Magnificent Obsession and The Tarnished Angels to watch again soon.

    Sirk’s creative use of Russell Metty’s cinematography and Russell Gausman’s sets impress me every time I see one of his films.
     
  11. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    I think I'll add in my two cents concerning Don't Look Now.
    I'm beginning to think that DLN isn't much of a horror. It's much more of a haunting drama in the same sense that Vertigo, Spellbound, and Rebecca are.
    In that sense, it's pretty good, though I was underwhelmed by it at first, but reflection is changing my opinion somewhat.
    RE: Julie Christie
    She's definitely in the Babe Hall of Fame. AND BOY DO YOU SEE PLENTY IN DLN!!! [​IMG]
     
  12. ChuckDeLa

    ChuckDeLa Cinematographer

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    Well, my comments won't be as eloquent as some of the others in this thread, but here's three I revisited in the past week:
    Red Beard [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    (previous viewing: ~3 years ago)
    This was my first OAR viewing of Red Beard, and boy did it look amazing. IMO, this is Kurosawa's most moving film, even more so than Ikiru, and perhaps my favorite after Seven Samurai. The kind of movie that makes you wish there were hundreds more like it. Very good commentary on the Criterion edition as well.
    Glengarry Glen Ross [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] 1/2
    (previous viewing: ~5 years ago)
    Do any women like this movie? I've never heard of one who does. My girlfriend was in the room as I watched this and she couldn't stand it. But I still love it. Extremely good actors portraying extremely despicable people with extremely brilliant dialogue. Looks nice, too! Haven't seen this is OAR since the theatrical release.
    Terminator 2: Judgement Day [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] 1/2
    (previous viewing: ~18 months ago)
    Still can't decide if I like this more or less than the original. It certainly wins in the thrills department, and the emotional moments (hokey though they may be) are more engaging. But the first one has a rawness and darkness that is very appealing to me. Okay, so... it's a bit hokey, and the FX are starting to look a bit dated, and the actual science of the situation is only given the barest of lip service... but still it's a good ride. My girlfriend popped this in last night and I intended to go read or something, but I found myself getting sucked in.
     
  13. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    ......Runs all over town trying to find Don't Look Now.........
     
  14. Rob Tomlin

    Rob Tomlin Producer

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    Don't Look Now has some very intriguing, beautiful, and unique images, just the kind of stuff that I think you would enjoy John! I was slightly underwhelmed by the story overall, though like Dome, upon reflection I think I like it more than I thought.
    A Clockwork Orange

    I consider myself a pretty big fan of Kubrick. However, when I saw A Clockwork Orange for the first time about ten years ago, I didn't particularly like it. It just seemed like a bunch of gratuitous violence.
    I recently watched it again, realizing that my taste in movies has changed a lot over the last several years. I also knew that being a Kubrick movie, chances were that I would probably enjoy it more this time around.
    I was right. I haven't been able to get this movie out of my mind since I saw it three days ago! There is so much more to this movie than what I remembered when I saw it so many years ago.
    It is much more than gratuitous violence. We are presented with several issues, such as whether the "cure" that the government used on Alex was worse than his "disease". Do the ends justify the means? Should we really feel sorry for Alex after the Government performed their experiment on him? The film is full of irony as well.
    Kubrick uses music to perfection in this movie. And, as usual, Kubrick gives us numerous unique visual images.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] 1/2
     
  15. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Did I mention that the DVD is now OOP and VERY hard to find? [​IMG]
     
  16. Justin_S

    Justin_S Producer

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    DON'T LOOK NOW is most definitely a very eerie and haunting horror film. It does contain a good amount of drama, but I don't see how anyone could not realize that this is indeed a horror film, and one of the greatest there is at that.
    Julie Christie is indeed extremely gorgeous, and I have thought this since I first saw her in DEMON SEED. Thankfully Paramount accidentally put the uncut version of the intense sex scene on their DVD. [​IMG]
    DON'T LOOK NOW is beautiful to look at, with gorgeous images, moody lighting, and stellar cinematography. It really makes Venice seem like a very foreboding and menacing place, yet completely gorgeous as well. Simply put, one of the best looking films there is!
    The film is full of impending dread, as well as several haunting scenes. One scene I find particularly haunting is when Donald Sutherland's character has a premonition of his own funeral.
    Very creepy, and quite unsettling. Then, of course there is the disturbing climax.
    This is definitely horror, and one of the most truly haunting.
     
  17. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    The Quatermass Xperiment (1955)
    Directed by Val Guest.
    It creeps. It crawls. It kills!
    It's like this: I was in the mood for a good, old-fashioned sf/horror flick, so I dusted off my VHS copy of The Quatermass Xperiment...
    Two young lovers are frolicking in a field when something roars overhead in the night sky. It's a spaceship! But is it of earthly or alien origin? As it turns out, it IS from Earth - it's part of the Quatermass experiment! That's Professor Bernard Quatermass to those of you not in the know. The spaceship crashes and the authorities, led by Professor Quatermass, rush to investigate. Of the three men on board, only one survives. The other two are nowhere to be found! The lone survivor is catatonic and seems oddly...changed. What is wrong with him? Could he be possessed by an alien lifeform capable of taking over the Earth by absorbing humans, zoo animals, and even cactuses? Oh, you betcha! So how do Quatermass and company plan on stopping the sucker?
    All kidding aside, The Quatermass Xperiment, along with its sequels Quatermass 2 and Quatermass and the Pit, are tops in the sf/horror genre. As noted above, the former was directed by Val Guest and he has created a suspenseful little thriller that avoids the cheesiness inherent in other like efforts. Brian Donlevy (kinda reminds you of Lon Chaney, Jr.) is fine as the stoic Quatermass. Truth be told, Quatermass doesn't actually do that much - he seems to be more of an observer than an actual participant in the proceedings. However, I do like his "We must keep going despite the risks!" attitude. And it's great to see that sentiment echoed in the closing shot as yet another spaceship takes off for the unknown. Space monsters, be damned!
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  18. Agee Bassett

    Agee Bassett Supporting Actor

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    Revisited Henry King's Twelve O'Clock High (1949) for the umpteenth time last night. To this day, still the most accurate and honest depiction of the day-to-day reality of fighting a war ever captured on film (the film is used by U.S. Navy and Air Force as a teaching aid for their officers-in-training); and a superb, absorbing character drama in its own right. All the more remarkable as a major Hollywood studio product of its day, it is perhaps unique in that it not once stoops to pander, propagandize, hyperbolize, abstract, deify, or condemn the people or events which comprise this amazing little film. One character makes a decision which indirectly leads to the suicide of another, and is not judged for it. Another repeats the course of action which caused the downfall of still another, and receives the same objective treatment. In Twelve O'clock High, the madness which ensues among these men of good will is truthfully revealed to be simply--and, tragically--an organic derivative of the madness that is war. It is the supreme antidote of the confected, cheap sentimentality and didacticism Hollywood war films have been awash in, from Flying Tigers to Saving Private Ryan. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    Regarding Don't Look Now, it will almost definitely alienate those seeking a traditional horror experience. As in Tarkovsky's Solaris, and the first three-quarters of The Shining, the horror is allegorical of the inner personal pain plaguing the protagonist (although it is stronger, and ultimately more rewarding than either example, IMO). Roeg isn't interested in cheap shocks or hackneyed storylines, but in the emotions and psychology of his characters. I highly recommend it for anyone sympathetic with stylish, serious investigation of how we deal with matters of loss and faith. (And especially for those of you participating in the cinematography tourney, if you're interested in voting in a couple of weeks. [​IMG])
     
  19. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Re: Twelve O'Clock High

    Well said! Still, I've been on the fence about picking up this title on DVD - it was my late father's favorite film and I've been hesitant to revisit it these last few years for fear of it being a painful experience. Well, I suppose it's time to put that behind me and give it another go...
     
  20. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    I'm revisiting Citizen Kane right now (you all knew it was going to happen to one of us sooner or later [​IMG] ). I've actually found something wrong with the film: I don't own Xanadu. But the electric bill must be hell to pay.
     

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