Return of the King/Lord of the Rings

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Hugh Jackes, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. Hugh Jackes

    Hugh Jackes Supporting Actor

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    I hope someone here can help me. I am actually Hugh's wife. As some of you know, we lost our oldest son 6 months ago. Return of the King was the first movie we saw after he died, and I was touched by so much in the movie, and how it related to our own pain. I loved what Gandolf told (Pippin?) about death, and would love to get that quote. Also, can you tell me if that quote was direct from Tolkien, or was it written for the movie? Thank you for you help. We are taking our Tim's ashes to the mountains this weekend, and I am considering that quote, in it's entirety, to read.
    Annette Jackes
    ever lovin' Mom to Tim & Dennis
    www.voiceofanangel.org
     
  2. Ricardo C

    Ricardo C Producer

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    Pippin: "I didn't think it would end this way".

    Gandalf: "End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path, one we all must take. The grey rain-courtain of this world rolls back, and all turns to silver glass... And then you see it.

    Pippin (enthralled): "What, Gandalf? See what?"

    Gandalf: "White shores, and beyond, a far green country under a swift sunrise".

    Pippin (relieved, smiling): "Well, that isn't so bad".

    Gandalf (with a smile): "No, it isn't".

    I hope that helps [​IMG]

    As for the origin of the dialogue, I need to spoilerize it [​IMG]

    The dialogue is based on the description of the Undying Lands given in the books, which is the land where the Elves go to when they depart Middle-earth. Mortals are banned from setting foot in them, according to Eru's (God) plan for the world. But given the physical and spiritual wounds that Bilbo and Frodo sustained as Ringbearers, they're granted special dispensattion to sail with the Elves, so that they may heal. Eventually, Legolas takes Gimli there with him, and it is implied that Sam sailed there too, after the passing of Rosie, many years after the end of the book.

    In Tolkien's works, paradise is not clearly defined, as all mortals who die in the world go to the Halls of Mandos, a transitional place where they await the Dagor Dagorath (Tolkien's version of the Apocalypse), in which Manwe (chief among the Valar, Eru's principal subjects) will deal final defeat to Morgoth (Sauron's master). After that, the world will be remade, and Eru's children will partake in this new world.
     
  3. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    Tolkien had some wonderful pieces on the passage of life and death:

    The Walking Song

    The Road goes ever on and on
    Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    And I must follow, if I can,
    Pursuing it with eager feet,
    Until it joins some larger way
    Where many paths and errands meet.
    And whither then? I cannot say.

    The Road goes ever on and on
    Down form the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    And I must follow, if I can,
    Pursuing it with weary feet,
    Until it joins some larger way
    Where many paths and errands meet.
    And whither then? I cannot say.

    The Road goes ever on and on
    Out form the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    Let others follow it who can!
    Let them a journey new begin,
    But I at last with weary feet
    Will turn towards the lighted inn,
    My evening-rest and sleep to meet.


    Bilbo's Last Song

    Day is ended, dim my eyes,
    but journey long before me lies.
    Farewell, friends! I hear the call.
    The ship's beside the stony wall.
    Foam is white and waves are grey;
    beyond the sunset leads my way.
    Foam is salt, the wind is free;
    I hear the rising of the Sea.

    Farewell, friends! The sails are set,
    the wind is east, the moorings fret.
    Shadows long before me lie,
    beneath the ever-bending sky,
    but islands lie behind the Sun
    that I shall raise ere all is done;
    lands there are to west of West,
    where night is quiet and sleep is rest.

    Guided by the Lonely Star,
    beyond the utmost harbour-bar,
    I'll find the heavens fair and free,
    and beaches of the Starlit Sea.
    Ship, my ship! I seek the West,
    and fields and mountains ever blest.
    Farewell to Middle-earth at last.
    I see the Star above my mast!


    If you have not read the books then may I suggest you do so? Perhaps you will find a resonnance of hope in the hopeless, of nobility in goodness, and faith in love. Not I, nor millions of others who have read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings can deny that it is a great comfort in times of sorrow. Indeed, it is a source of enduring strength and but a shadow of that inspiration can the movies, excellent as they are, provide.


    Two final quotes upon which to ponder.


    When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.
    Kahlil Gibran

    Never ask the Gods for the life set free from grief, but ask for courage that endureth long.
    Menander (342-291 BC) Athenian comedy writer, friend of Epicurus
     
  4. Hugh Jackes

    Hugh Jackes Supporting Actor

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    Thank you all. God Bless you all.
    Annette
     
  5. Chuck Mayer

    Chuck Mayer Lead Actor

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    Annette,

    Here's the quote from the Return of the King, as written by Tolkien:

    Then Frodo kissed Merry and Pippin, and last of all Sam, and went aboard; and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew, and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth; and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore glimmered and was lost. And the ship went out into the High Sea and passed on into the West, until at last on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.

    ROTK was the last movie I saw *before* my son was born. I read of Tim (from Hugh, on this very forum) with an new infant at home, and learned an important lesson from your husband.

    It is the love and life of your sons that gives you the strength to endure what you have to endure. It is comforting to me, when I look at my own child, to know that the strength he gives me (and hopefully, I to him) can strengthen me, and give me the courage that you and Hugh have shown.

    The ROTK song by Annie Lennox will always make me think of my son.

    My prayers for you and your family,
    Chuck
     

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