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"Retail vs OEM"... What's it all mean?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Christopher Chung, Feb 7, 2002.

  1. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Quick question about me building my computer...
    What is the difference between the AMD XP1800+ OEM and the AMD XP1800+ Retail? Same(?) processor just a different "ending"
    I've seen a lot of this Retail vs OEM thing on a lot of things like video cards etc. What is better if anything, and what does it mean?
    Thanks
    Chris
     
  2. Duncan Barth

    Duncan Barth Stunt Coordinator

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    Retail parts are meant to be sold to end users. They usually have a pretty box that looks good on the shelf in a store, documentation, sometimes have extra software/goodies, and are supported directly by the manufacturer.

    OEM parts are 'bulk' items that are generally sold to system integrators, VARs, and the like. They tend to lack the spiffy packaging and other stuff; they tend to be the part only (and maybe a driver CD). Sometimes warranties are shorter. OEM parts are usually cheaper.

    When it comes to processors, here's the difference: An OEM Athlon is just the bare chip. Retail Athlons come with a box, an AMD sticker, and a heatsink/fan combo and some documentation.

    So which to buy? Depends on your needs. OEM will usually be cheaper, but remember to factor in the price of the third party heatsink/fan that you'll need.

    If you have some fancy cooling/overclocking need, you probably want to buy the OEM part, since you'll want a high performance heatsink/fan.

    If you don't really care about this, you should probably just buy the retail version.
     
  3. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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    For processors if you can get a retail chip for a little more than a OEM one I'd say do it. The retail chips carry a 3 year warranty while an OEM one will carry a 15 day to 1 year warranty depending on where you buy it.
     
  4. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Awsome Duncan and Brian! You guys cleared it all up for me, thanks! Appreciate it a lot!
     

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