Replace my CD changer with a DVD changer?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Craig_F, Aug 6, 2002.

  1. Craig_F

    Craig_F Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm considering replacing my Yamaha CD changer (I don't know the model number - it's a nice unit, but not super high end) with a DVD changer. I want to add a DVD player, but I figure it would be much easier to have one component that can play CD's, CD-R's and DVD's. However, I have heard that the majority of the DVD changers out there take a long time when they switch from one disc to another, and that it takes a while for it to determine whether it's looking at a CD or a DVD. Is that still the case with the new DVD changers? I'd really prefer to have one box that does it all, but from what I've read, I might be better off getting a single disc DVD and keeping my CD changer. Also, how long will it be before they come out with an "affordable" DVD recorder? I've seen a couple out now that are in the $900 range, which means within a couple years, they'll be pretty commonplace. I'd hate to get a DVD player, and to then have to run out and get a DVD recorder in two years.

    The only DVD changer that I've seen that I liked was the Yamaha DVC6480. It's about $600. Any comments on that unit or a comparable Denon would be appreciated.
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've read here that DVD changers are not as fast as CD changers for CD use. I have no direct experience with DVD changers, but I do have a LD player that doubles as a CD changer (Pioneer CLD-M401) and it's a pretty fair CD changer. I don't mind the slowness and crankyness, surely not comparable to a DVD changer.
    I think that the DVD megachcngers are more trouble than they're worth, mostly because so many DVDs have content on both sides. My brother recently bought a Sony DVD changer to replace his old Toshiba 2107 DVD player and (broken) Sony CD changer. He's been very happy with it. Audiophiles will scoff at the quality from such a unit but I personally wouldn't hold off on buying one. [​IMG]
    Sorry I can't give you more specific help.
     
  3. Conroy Tesa

    Conroy Tesa Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2001
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was looking to replace an old Denon cd changer with a DVD changer but I'm still looking.

    They are SLOW, alot don't have true random shuffle.

    Still looking (at Sony at the moment.)
     
  4. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2000
    Messages:
    9,413
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Philip, Sony's DVP-CX860 and 'CX870D 301-disc DVD megachangers offer both-side play of DVDs, much like laserdisc players. However, I don't know how well the feature works in terms of response time. Of course, movies are usually contained on one side of a DVD, so the feature on the Sony players is not often used in the same way as with laserdiscs.
    In looking at Crutchfield's web site, this is how the "flip" feature manifests itself in the Sony players (specifically mentioned for the 'CX860):
     
  5. AustinKW

    AustinKW Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Craig,

    I'm a firm believer in "horses for courses". Why try to bend something into something it's not? The multi-disc CD changers with digital out are just great at what they do - swap and spin CDs. The audio quality is then up to the DACs in your processor (why pay twice for good electronics?). With DVD's you're looking for great video quality and your swap time is measured in hours not minutes so a quick-change capability is really not required. I'd rethink your basic premise if I were you. A nice mega-changer for CDs coupled with a single-purpose DVD-Video player seems like the ticket. My take.

    Austin
     
  6. Selden Ball

    Selden Ball Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Messages:
    412
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Selden
    Another potential gotcha is that many DVD players do a poor job of playing some CD-R discs, so you have to look carefully at their specs.

    If there's a real A/V store in your area, I'd suggest arranging to test whatever changers they have to see which one does what you want, and then buy it from them. The price won't be as low as you might find online, but you're paying for their assistance.
     
  7. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2000
    Messages:
    9,413
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Craig, welcome to the Forum. If CD sound quality is what you are after ultimately, then go with a straight CD player. Compromises are often made in the audio section of DVD players relative to comparably priced CD players, so CD players are often the better way to go. If you also want a DVD player, there are many quality players available for cheap, so perhaps two components are not out of the realm of possibility.
     
  8. AustinKW

    AustinKW Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Keith,

    What are you talking about? What "audio section" in players? Why on earth would you pay twice for the electronics to DAC CD? Jeez, connect it digitally to the latest whiz-bang in the processor and you're good to go. CD players should spin and spit and that's it. Let the processor lift the heavy load.

    Austin

     
  9. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2000
    Messages:
    9,413
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Austin, you obviously are one of those who thinks that all transports sound the same. "It's just reading the 1s and 0s. What's the difference?" Well, there is a difference among transports, so one should never assume that anything that reads a CD will do the job optimally. You should read up on jitter.

    Also, it is possible for an analog connection to a receiver or pre/pro (with analog bypass engaged), which utilizes the player's DAC(s) and analog output stage, to provide better sound than a digital connection to a receiver or pre/pro. To say that anything that plays CDs should be connected with a digital cable is simplistic.

    Finally, not everyone in the world is playing CDs through a home-theater system, so not everyone is using A/V pre/pros. Some still use stereo pre-amps and integrated amps that do not have digital processing capability, so sound through the analog outputs is absolutely relevant.

    You said:

     
  10. Craig_F

    Craig_F Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the advice guys. To clarify - I don't want the changer capacity for DVD's, I want the changer for CD's. I like to put 5 discs in the changer and hit the random button, and let it fly for a few hours. The real "problem" is that I'm using an optical out from my CD changer to my amp. My amp only has one optical "in". I can't have an optical input for both a DVD player and a CD changer, which is why I would like one unit to play both. Looking at some of the products available, some units - CHEAP units - play MP3, DVD, CD, CD-R, CD-RW, Kodak picture discs, etc.... And that was a $90 unit. I just want Yamaha to make a great 5 disc changer that plays everything and has excellent audio and video. Is that too much to ask for? Perhaps. But they get better every year, which is why I've been holding off - but I'm getting tired of waiting.

    After poking around in this forum, it appears that there is a lot of information I was unaware of. This is bad - I probably would have been perfectly happy with a $500 unit, but after reading some of this stuff, I probably won't be happy unless I spend $1500.
     
  11. AustinKW

    AustinKW Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Keith,

    I apologize for the tone of my post - I meant it to be flip, not harsh.

    You are quite correct - all transports are essentially the same. Jitter is simply a non-issue with all but the lowest quality players. You know it and I know it.

    Further, given the quality and quantity of DACs (4 or even 8 a side in flagships) in modern receivers and pre-pros, I take issue with your assertion that the audio stage in players is likely to be better that that of the processor. You have to go pretty high up the food chain before you'll find a player that can compete with even a mid-fi 3802's DACs.

    Finally, your point about full analog setups is valid. However, this thread referenced DVDs so I assumed we were talking about an AV setup rather than the pure audio arrangement you mentioned.

    Austin

     
  12. AustinKW

    AustinKW Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Craig,

    Look at your receiver carefully. Does it have a digital coax input? If so, you can then look for a dedicated player that has a coax out and you'll be all digital. One player on optical and the other on digital coax. If not, you might want to consider a receiver upgrade. Even mid-fi receivers come with 4 or 5 digital inputs (mix of optical and coax). Good luck.

    Austin

     
  13. Craig_F

    Craig_F Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I do have a coaxial digital input. Is there any difference in sound quality between a coaxial digital input and an optical? Also, both of the digital inputs are wired to my DVD input, so having two machines hooked up to the same button might not be the greatest set up, but it would probably work. Again, since my wife can barely figure out how to use my system now, I'm trying to keep it simple.
     
  14. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2001
    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Craig, I'd go with a 5 cd changer and a dedicated dvd player. It's what I decided to do so I picked up a Marantz CC-3000 for $200 that works and sounds fine. There is also the issue that by having one player do double duty, you're accelerating the MTTF for the player - and when it does break, you'll lose both dvd capability and cd playing capability.

    As for digital inputs, you can have one go to your dvd player and one go to your cd changer - or you can use the analog outs on your cd changer if it sounds better or you notice no difference in sound. I tried it both ways and actually ended up sticking with the Marantz analog outs.

    cheers,


    --tom
     
  15. AustinKW

    AustinKW Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Craig,

    Looks like you're in business. No diff between coax and optical regardless of all the BS you'll probably hear. Hook up one (say optical) from player to receiver and designate it as "DVD". This will be for the movie soundtracks. Hook up the other (coax) and designate it as "CD". This will be for music. Then set your receiver speaker selections and surround modes to your liking for each of the two "inputs". When the wife wants music, she spins a CD in the player and punches "CD" on the receiver remote. For movies, she plunks in "Shrek" and punches "DVD" on the receiver. Makes life around the house much more enjoyable - believe me! Good luck.

    Austin

     

Share This Page