Remote connection to company's T1 line ... Help

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Steve Clark, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. Steve Clark

    Steve Clark Second Unit

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    My company just installed a T1 line at the office. Being a principal of the company, they would not mind if I could figure out a way to connect to the company's line from my PC at home. My PC has a dial-up modem only. The installer of the T1 said there was a FREE way (other than PC Anywhere) to connect into the line through my PC's Internet Explorer and Outlook Express programs. He did not give me any specific details however. Does anyone know how to get me started? I can find out my company's internet ID and password.
     
  2. Mark Hsieh

    Mark Hsieh Agent

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    Are you talking about dialing in to like a terminal screen, or remotely using the computer? Check out VNC if you want to remotely control it..of course you'll need the ip and VNC makes you set a password.
     
  3. Chad Ellinger

    Chad Ellinger Second Unit

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    I'm a little confused as to what you are trying to do.
    1) If you want to connect to your company's local network from home, you can set up Virtual Private Networking (VPN) access. When you are dialed into your ISP from home, you run the VPN client and have access to your company's local network shares, email, etc.
    2) With a VPN connection established, you can remotely access the desktop of PCs running Windows 2000 Server and Terminal Services. A terminal services client works a lot like PC Anywhere (i.e. you actually remotely control the computer's desktop), and I believe it is available for free from Microsoft (they call it "Remote Desktop Connection").
    3) If you are talking about somehow tapping into your company's T1 line from home and using it for internet access as opposed to dialup, that's not going to be possible short of extending the line directly to your house.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Steve Clark

    Steve Clark Second Unit

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    Thanks Mark and Chad. I was only interested into accessing the internet through my company's ISP via my PC at home so I could dump AOL. There is no need for me to access any desktop or file server at work. The T1 line installer at work acted like I could achieve this.
     
  5. Jeff R.

    Jeff R. Stunt Coordinator

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    I've never done this so I can't give you specific instructions but I'm pretty sure you would have to have a dedicated phone line at work that connects to the server. Your computer can then dial into that line and log in and use the remote access services which include internet access. It wouldn't require any additional software but would require that your company has a phone line, modem, and server set up for this. I'm not 100% sure about this though.
     
  6. Mark Hsieh

    Mark Hsieh Agent

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    As Chad said, it would be possible to use the T1 connection at home, but you would have to get your house wired in order for that to happen...unless they're willing to shell out the money for that, I'd just dump AOL and get a normal isp.
     
  7. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Yeah the T1 installer made it sound like it was easy because he doesn't have to help you do it.

    If your company has a Windows NT/2000 Server, then you can try its Remote Access & Routing service. It will let you dial in and access anything on the network, including reach out to the Internet.
     
  8. jeff peterson

    jeff peterson Supporting Actor

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    But even if you could connect to the T1 line, wouldn't you still be connecting to it via the telephone ilne from your home...thus slowing things down to it's speed anyway?

    Kind of makes it a moot point?
     
  9. Tim Kilbride

    Tim Kilbride Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree with Jeff...

    If you connect to your office via modem...you really haven't gained anything other that dump aol. I actually use the DS3 at my office for an ISP at home by renting an ADSL from local telco and then dial into the DS3 via the ADSL...it flies here...and no more AOL...

    Tim K.
     
  10. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    The point, other than the pleasure of dumping AOL, would be speed. Presumably the office T1 line won't be saturated by too many users. The bottleneck will be at the modem, not an oversubscribed POP.

    But as I understand it, you can't get 56K class download speeds (i.e. faster than 33.6K) when dialing modem-to-modem. To get 56K class the other "modem" has to be on a digital line so that the signal is analog between your house and the phone company, but digital between the phone company and the ISP. This may not matter if your local AOL dialup doesn't even have 56K. (I remember my local AOL dialup was still stuck at 9600 in 1995 and didn't upgrade until they got their asses kicked by the ISP boom.)
     
  11. Ken Bartke

    Ken Bartke Auditioning

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    A little known utility in Win98 is dialup server. It does not get installed using the default installation but it is available on the Win98 CD.
    This utility allows a Win98 machine to bridge a LAN Internet connection with a modem connection. In other words you could dial into a PC that has Dialup Server enabled and then access the Office Internet via the T1.
    See here for more info: http://www.chipcenter.com/circuitcel...0/Q1_00_10.htm
    Ken
     

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