Release Dates-Do they even mean anything?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Bardon, Nov 18, 2002.

  1. Chris Bardon

    Chris Bardon Cinematographer

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    Everywhere I look, I see Metroid prime's release date listed as the 18th. So today I walk into Future Shop-Nothing. EB-doesn't have it yet. Microplay-nothing. I've heard anything from "We should have it tomorrow" to "sometime within the next week" from retailers. Now if I want to get a DVD on street date, there's never any problem: I've been in 20 minutes after the store opens and they already have that week's discs out. With games though, who knows when you'll be able to get it.

    Hopefully I'll be able to snag a copy this week...if anyone ever gets it in that is.
     
  2. Shaun Lynde

    Shaun Lynde Auditioning

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    Chris, as far as Future Shop, their game shipments arrive later in the week. That is why in Future Shop ads you see the 'Get it First' tag for a few days after the release date that is posted on ebgames.com or gamestop.com . For example Splinter Cell was released today, but in a Future Shop flyer it says Nov 22. For Metroid the 'Get it First' tag shows Nov 20th.
     
  3. Morgan Jolley

    Morgan Jolley Lead Actor

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    Usually, release dates are really ship dates. Retailers can pay more or less to get the shipments earlier or late, respectively.
     
  4. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    As far as EB goes, the release date they post to their website is a ship date. It'll arrive on your doorstep (if ordered thru the site with overnight shipping) or in their stores on the following day...
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    It would make it so much easier on everyone if they just +1d every day they're given you know?
     
  6. Graeme Clark

    Graeme Clark Cinematographer

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    DVDs and CDs are there on the date because they tend to be at the stores the previous week, sitting in the back waiting for the street date.

    In most cases, for games, this doesn't happen. The release dates, as stated, are usually ship days. So depending on where the stores are and how their shipped, it can take a few extra days.

    One difference with games is that they tend to be worked on until the last minute (more so for PC games than console), sent to reproduction, and shipped to the stores. Some games go gold and are on shelves within a week.

    CDs and DVDs are all done well in advance, sent to press and radio stations for reviews and promo, marketing goes into full swing, a single is released (for CDs) and a release date that can easily be kept is set.
     
  7. Andre F

    Andre F Screenwriter

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    I know this is such a pain. I always call first now...or wait for UPS to deliver it!
     
  8. Dave F

    Dave F Cinematographer

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    I just hate stores like my local Best Buy that feel compelled to hold back a game a few days until the "release date". [​IMG]
    -Dave
     
  9. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    Of course, the notion of never receiving stock from a particular company again because you broke street date IS pretty compelling...
     
  10. Camp

    Camp Cinematographer

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    My knowledge of the music/video industry is limited but it's my understanding a lot of the timeliness in release dates has to do with the distribution companies. There is no equivalent in the game industry as each publisher has its own system for getting games to retail. The lack of a consistent middle man leaves the release date in limbo.
     

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