Rehash -- AMD/Intel

Discussion in 'Computers' started by SethH, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Hi there. I made a thread several days ago about building a new computer. I was set on an AMD Athlon64 3200+ processor for my system. But I'm starting to question myself. Help me out please:

    Possibility 1:
    AMD Athlon64 3200+ (Newcastle 2.2GHz)
    MSI K8N Neo Platinum nForce3 250
    Price: $344
    Advantages: nForce3 chipset, ability to go 64-bit, gigabit ethernet

    Possibility 2:
    Intel LGA 775 P4 530 3.0GHz
    Intel BOXD915PCYL motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...121-234&depa=1)
    Price: $353
    Advantages: higher clock speed, hyper-threading, mobo has PCI-X slots which is cool, matrix RAID

    Everything else in the system will be the same either way, so what do you guys think? I'm not planning to overclock and I don't play too many games.
     
  2. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    Well, I'll add a few.. I switched from Intel to AMD.. here are some benefits you're leaving out:

    The LGA775 chip runs MUCH hotter then it's AMD counterpart; which is a real spin from the past when AMDs ran hot and Intel cool, not so anymore. (if you private message me, I'll let you know where I work at the moment so you can get some ideas of the testing on that [​IMG]

    The AMD platform has a couple other features you're leaving out:

    * Nvidia Onboard Hardware Firewall, built into the chipset. Very effective, easy to customize, and great reporting mechanism.

    * Nvidia Soundcontrol, which makes it second only to an Audigy 2 series card in performance; the new Nvidia method works with all CODECs on board, lowers CPU usage and generally rocks. Uses far less CPU then Intel's solution.

    * While you don't mention games, you have to throw out a good benchmark that shows it:
    http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets...spx?i=2149&p=7

    Where the AMD 3000+ nips at a Pentium IV 3.4G Extreme Edition (the 3200+, not shown, clobbers it)

    * If you're using Windows XP, and get Service Pack2, you get an added protection: use of the NX bit, which allows for the stopping of execution of processes based on repetitive nature via user command; so virus problems go down as the ones that stay in stuck cycles (like overflow attacks) can be stopped by the processor before they impact windows.. making your machine stay up longer and a touch safer.


    Here's what I'd tell you:

    If you're doing tons of DiVX encoding, go with Intel. Their CODEC is written around it.

    If you're doing almost anything else.. I'd go with the AMD..
     
  3. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Much of my work is still in general work applications using Excel and Access for class projects. I also have to write and compile on occassion VB.NET or Java code. Additionally I occasionally have to run simulation models or linear/goal programming models which are fairly processor intensive. I play very few if any games, so that's not too important. My thought was just that the hyperthreading may prove beneficial in general multitasking work.

    Also, about the audio, the board I linked to above has the new Intel HD Audio which is supposed to be pretty good, but I haven't found any direct reviews of it.
     
  4. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    It sounds good. It's just still more CPU intensive then Nvidia or Creative.
     
  5. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    If you want video encoding go with Intel Northwood, everything else AMD. Not a big variety of PCI Express vid cards out there but since you don't game shouldn't be a biggie.

    Intel's HD Audio sounds great, 24/96 audio sent via S/PDIF. [​IMG] Article here.
     
  6. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I agree that there aren't many PCI-X video cards, but there's one by Abit that's $87 and one by Asus that's $94. Both have 128MB RAM, so price and memory is in line with what I was planning to pay for 8xAGP. The PCI-X is more appealing for the rest of the PCI slots though. The higher bandwidth allows one to upgrade to things like Firewire800 and any future connections without any lag in performance. Also, the matrix RAID thing is really cool. I really like the idea of being able to do both RAID-1 and RAID-0 with only 2 SATA drives. I'm not completely sold on the intel, but I wanted to add some benefits of it as only AMD supporters have spoken up thus far.
     
  7. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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  8. Allan Petersen

    Allan Petersen Stunt Coordinator

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    I noticed a definite inprovement in responsiveness in the Windows environment when I switched from an older P4 2.8GHz to a P4 3.06GHz with hyper-threading (more than can be explained by a relatively puny 200MHz increase in CPU speed). I too work with heavy applications and the hyper-threading technology does give me faster load times and application switching compared to non-HT equipped P4 CPU's. The increase in game performance feels negligible to me.

    The AMD does look tempting with the 64-bit technology, although I'm a bit peeved about the fact that I'd have to use a Windows beta if I want a 64-bit OS (Linux is out of the question for me at present).

    Bottom line is they both look good if you don't plan to overclock, and don't really care about a handful of extra frames in Doom 3 or whatever. The way I see it, you really have to make a choice between technology that's fully supported now (P4 HT), or will be sometime in the near future (AMD 64-bit).
     
  9. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I stand corrected. But I stand by my stance that PCI Express is going to be used significantly in the near future, so I still list that as a benefit for the Intel side of things.
     
  10. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    That's the way I'm starting to look at it too. While the 64-bit is very appealing, by the time Windows gets a 64-bit OS entirely up-and-running (meaning not in beta) the processor will probably barely meet the minimum requirements for the system and will be fairly out-dated.
     
  11. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    I agree with this. I don't envy you having to choose a new processor and motherboard at this point in time. 64-bit is coming and PCI-Express is coming. The BTX motherboard form factor is coming. Pentium 4 is reaching its end, apparently Intel will focus on Pentium M with dual cores. All this adds up to a reluctance to spend a lot on what's available today when so many aspects are approaching the next generation simultaneously.
     

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