Red push attenuator and mitsubishi

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DAN NEIR, May 29, 2001.

  1. DAN NEIR

    DAN NEIR Guest

    I'm expecting my new 46807 tomorrow and have read about a red push attenuator on a couple of threads, my questions are: What is an attenuator? Where do you get it? (I heard radio shack) How do you use it? And what does it do?? I also have avia coming by the weekend, will that be enough or do I still need the attenuator?
     
  2. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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  3. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    How would I use the red push attenuator with a Denon 3801 receiver? I was planning on running all of my components into the 3801 using their highest quality outputs (component on the DVD player, SVideo on the Playstation, and composite on the cable box and VHS deck), and then out to the TV via the component outputs on the 3801. I'd put the attenuator on the run from the receiver to the tv, correct? Can that be done with the 3801? I'm a bit confused by the fact that it can't handle both S-Video and Component video at the same time. Can anyone help clear my clouded mind? Thanks guys [​IMG]
    ------------------
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    Donald Roeber
    Generating 2048 bits of randomness...
     
  4. Alan Wild

    Alan Wild Stunt Coordinator

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    I also have a Denon 3801 and a WT-46807... however I'm sorry to say that you won't be able to do what you are planning. The Denon 3801 will NOT internally convert a composite, s-video, or component signal into any other type. It is merely a simple switch. For a given input it will send the appropriate composite in/s-video in (and component in if one is mapped to that input) to the corresponding outs. If your equipment uses all three formats then you will need all three types of cables running to your set.
    This is not unnusual. I have only ever heard of one Receiver that has the brains to do this type of conversion (and I think it was manufactured by Kenwood.... sound right to anyone?). Generally speaking receivers do not have this kind of circuitry.
    My advice... the 46807 has plenty of inputs. Run component straight from the DVD into the set. Run all of your other devices into your receiver.... where possible use S-video.... I bought an S-video cable for my PS2 and N64 just so everything was on S-video. If you are down to like one device that's on composite then look into getting a composite to svideo converter.... except to spend about $100 on one. Finally, get a good programable remote like a Phillips Pronto and write macros to switch the TV inputs and the receiver inputs at the same time.
     
  5. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    This page from Home Theater Spot has links to most every tweak you need as a new Mitsubishi TV owner.
    Take note of "Another Red Push Fix (no soldering required)" to learn about an inexpensive and entirely functional way to reduce red push, using an off-the-shelf 3dB attenuator and plug-in/screw-on connectors that will make it work with the RCA jacks of your DVD player or TV. I did it this way, spent $11, and it works like a charm on my 65907.
    - Steve
     
  6. Bill_M

    Bill_M Agent

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    Is it possible to fix green push with one?
     
  7. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Bill,
    I don't think green can be fixed in the same manner although I may be wrong. An analog Component signal is made up of a red signal, a blue signal and then a luminance signal. Given these 3, it is mathematically possible to determine green which is what the tv does. If you were to increase/decrease the luminance signal, I am not sure what that would do but I'd be curious to know the outcome if you try.
    --tom
     

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