Recording to VCR from TV problem.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Amit Patel, Mar 18, 2002.

  1. Amit Patel

    Amit Patel Agent

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    I want to record TV programs but I do not like to connect my VCR IN to cable first and then to my TV vhf/uhf IN from VCR OUT because I do not like to route VIDEO signal through my VCR. However my TV and VCR manuals do specify connecting VCR from incoming cable.

    I connected audio/video out from my TV to audio/video IN to my VCR to record, however this way I was not able to record. I configured my TV,VCR and receiver as per receiver manual and connected VCR to my receiver as per receiver’s manual that is audio/video IN/OUT from receiver to audio/video IN/OUT to VCR but was not successful.

    My question is Do I really need to connect my VCR first to the incoming cable and then to the TV?.

    Followings are my components for your information. Any Ideas or suggestions ?.

    SONY Receiver STR-DA555ES.

    SONY TV KP-61HS10.

    SONY VCR SLV-M91HF.

    SONY DVP-CX850D 200 DISC DVD player.

    Thanks
     
  2. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Well, you can always run a splitter before the VCR. Then simply run one cable to the TV and another cable to the VCR. This is fairly easy to do.

    The point in hooking your VCR up to the reciever is two fold. One, the receiver can do your video switching and secondly, it will allow you to record any source coming into the receiver to the VCR.

    C. Ryan
     
  3. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    One more thing. It all depends on what you think you will want to do. If you do not want to have your receiver do video switching, then you do not have to hook up your VCR-out to the Recevier-in. If you do not want to record sources going into the receiver to the VCR, then you do not have to hook up the Receiver-out to the VCR-in.

    Also, since you do not have a cable box, you will have to run the Cable line directly to your VCR. However, you can still split the cable as I mentioned above and run one line each to the VCR and TV. This may or may not improve your video quality output to the TV. Basically the VCR is acting as a splitter when you run the cable through the VCR to the TV. If your VCR has a good quality "splitter" within, you will not see any improvement when using an external splitter.

    C. Ryan
     
  4. Amit Patel

    Amit Patel Agent

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    Does it mean that I MUST have to use incoming cable signal to VCR and not TV ?. And then go from VCR to TV ?. Previously I have recorded TV programs without going cable signal first to the VCR. My basic question is why I am having a problem with type of connection I have which is using TV’s audio/video OUT directly to VCR’s audio/video IN to record and do not use VCR for receiving the signal. If I use receiver than I have to keep my receiver on whenever I am recording (I have to find out if my receiver can turn on/off automatically though)

    Thanks,
     
  5. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Well, again, you can always do the simple splitter as I mentioned before.

    It depends on the TV really. You need to look at the manual and see what its outputs can do. I would think in most cases, that the TV output will only output the current signal. Meaning, if you are watching channel five, you can record channel five - but nothing else. You will not be able to watch one thing and record another because the TV will only ouput what you are currently viewing. Again, this depends on the TV.

    Are you worried about signal degredation as the cable goes through the VCR? If this is your worry, hook your cable directly to the tv and then through the VCR and see if you notice any problems.

    C. Ryan
     
  6. Amit Patel

    Amit Patel Agent

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    I do worry regarding signal degradation as the cable goes through my VCR and then to the TV. I am aware that if I go through TV, only channel currently set can be recorded. You did raise a fair point though, I should check both connection and see if there is a significant different in Video quality. However I am curious and really want to find out that why my connection does not work the way it is set up, that is TV audio/video OUT to VCR audio/video IN.
     
  7. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Ok. What exactly is not working about it? Are you not able to record the show that you are watching? Meaning the VCR is not getting a signal at all from the TV when the TV is turned on.

    If not, then it is possible that you have to turn on your TV outputs through the TV's menu settings.

    Let us know,

    C. Ryan
     
  8. Amit Patel

    Amit Patel Agent

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    VCR is not recording at all. I just call SONY and they says that to record any program from TV, I must use cable signal to VCR and then to TV. I still can get it, if this is true then why my TV has audio/video OUT?. What is ‘VIDEO out’ from TV is really meant for ?. I have 14 year Akai VCR that does record directly from TV.

    Unfortunately newer VCRs do come with more functions then the older VCRs in a restrictive way. I may have to just route cable signal to VCR then to the TV or get splitter. Do you recommend any splitter available out there in the market?

    Thanks for your assistance.

    Followings are my components for your information. Any Ideas or suggestions ?.

    SONY Receiver STR-DA555ES.

    SONY TV KP-61HS10.

    SONY VCR SLV-M91HF.

    SONY DVP-CX850D 200 DISC DVD player
     
  9. RichN

    RichN Stunt Coordinator

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    Just for grins, try pressing your TV/VCR button on the VCR and see if anything changes. You may be trying to use the tuner in the VCR and with nothing connected to the input, you will record nothing. Just an idea, because I've had more than my share of problems caused by that one, little button.

    RichN
     
  10. MikePon

    MikePon Extra

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    You can record the signal coming from your TV on your VCR.

    First, you will have to have your TV turned on and tuned to the channel that you want to record.

    Second, you have to tell the VCR to record from the line level jacks as opposed to the tuner section. I do not know how to do this on your specific VCR but I'm sure it is possible.

    All this being said, IMHO, I would not bother going through all of this. If you use RG-6 coax and have good crimps your signal should not degrade at all. Still if you are worried, run the cable to you VCR only and use the VCR's tuner to display on TV. Basically use the TV as simply a monitor.
     
  11. Amit Patel

    Amit Patel Agent

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    Thanks for the information guys, I may use cable signal to

    VCR IN and than from VCR OUT to TV IN as you

    indicated. My VCR manul have 5 types of hookup and all five require cable signal connecting to VCR IN first and then to the TV IN from VCR OUT. However I still do not

    understand why my TV has a audio/video OUT ?.

    I understand 'audio' part, but where can I use 'video'

    part of the TV OUT.

    Thanks again,

    Amit.
     
  12. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    We have have two tv audio/video paths from tv to receiver and they are redundant -- from the back of the tv and from the VCR. Both work but in (1) you have to use the receiver and make another dial switch.

    1)Connecting tv audio RCA to the rcvr gives you the tv sound switching thru the receiver, but you have to turn the receiver source dial to D-TV on the rcvr.

    2) It is more convenient (with a VCR) to run VCR audio out and VCR video out to the receiver. Then on the rcvr you switch to say VCR1. Then you can leave it on this setting for both tv broadcast AND VCR videos. You use the VCR remote to chg tv chls.

    (3) If you run the DVD player with s-video out, you need an s-video cable from rcvr MONITOR OUT to tv's s-video. If you use COMPONENT from yr Sony DVD direct to tv, then you need a COMPOSITE cable from rcvr Monitor Out to tv.

    I run mine like Mike says above in his last graf.
     
  13. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    A lot of folks are confused by the idea of "recording off of the TV".
    Normally the VCR records "off the air" (or off of the cable TV feed) using its own channel selector, not "off of the TV". VCR instructions only tell you how to record "off the air". Here the VCR always goes between the antenna (or cable TV feed) and the TV.
    >>> What is the video out on the TV for?
    This is to daisy chain several TV sets to play the same program and under control from one "remote", for example in a school auditorium. It can also be used to feed a VCR in which case you are "recording off of the TV". Here the TV has to be turned on and tuned to the channel you want to record.
    If your TV has video out (very few do) you can keep your VCR hooked up to record off of the TV if you want.
    But the advantage of recording "off the air" instead is that you can record one channel while watching another, and you can record with the TV turned off.
    Also confusing to many folks is that video ultimately heads towards the TV while the audio always heads towards the A/V receiver if there is one. So for those systems where the TV's own channel selector is still being used, the TV audio outputs will be sending audio to the A/V receiver but the TV's video out (if any) is not supposed to be connected to the A/V receiver.
    If there is no A/V receiver or external sound system, both video and audio heads towards the TV which is easier to describe, also.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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