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Recording to MP3 (1 Viewer)

Mark Shannon

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I have several old vinel(sp?) records that I would love to put onto my computer... I haven't checked yet, but I'm pretty sure my sound card has a line in jack...but I don't know what program I can use to do this? I know I can't use Windows sound recorder, as that only does 60s wav's...

It would be great if someone could recommend a program that can create MP3's from line in.....thnx....

PS... will the volume have to be adjusted somehow? I heard somewhere that turntables have very low sound output.
 

Tekara

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I would reccomend initially recording the input into a wav then recompressing the wav into a MP3. through this method there is less chance of skipping in the mp3 (skips are caused when the computer hits 100% usage and can no longer encode on the fly for a brief moment).

and yes turntables need a pre-amp to make their inputs line-level, that's why a lot of recievers have a seperate input for them (phono). should be able to find one at radio shack for cheap.
 

Sathyan

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High Criteria's TotalRecorder is a cheap ($11) & easy app to use for recording to WAV or a compressed format.

I recommend using TotalRecorder to record to WAV and then compress to a VBR MP3 with Lame.

If any clean up needs to be done, do it on the WAV (Syntrillium's CoolEdit, $60, is good for this) before compression.

The part number for the RadioShack preamp is: 970-1018; costs $25 new. NB some turntables (like the sub $150 Sony, AudioTechnica, and Denon have builtin preamps).
 

Mark Shannon

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Thnx...

well, buying software seems to be out of the question, as I am only 16...and don't really want to buy any software (you know, the whole limited income thing)...



NB some turntables
what do you mean NB???

I haven't bought one yet, but will in the near future... if I were to buy one with a built in preamp, would I still be able to connect it to the phono input on my reciever, or would I have to connect it to another input?


Thank you for the input...
 

Ted Lee

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if your tt has a built in amp, then you would connect it to a regular "line-level" input - essentially any input other than the phono.
 

Mark Shannon

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essentially any input other than the phono.
well, that gives me a decision...get a TT w/o pre-amp, and buy one for $25 to connect to computer, or get one with and connect to a line level input...


I think I might go with the seperate pre-amp route, as I want to keep the line-level inputs on my reciever open for other components...

That is, unless someone can give me a reason why not...
 

Sathyan

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Mark bk,

NB, or more properly n.b., is an abbreviation for nota bene which is a common Latin expression used to draw attention to what follows.

On the preamp issue. Most of the built-in preamp (either on turntable or receiver) are not very good but all the turntable preamps can be bypassed so you can connect to the phono input. I would not exclude any 'tables because they had a preamp (that these 'tables aren't very good is a separate issue)

What's your budget so I can give you some specific recommendations?

For software, if you don't want to spend any money check your system to see if you have a serviceable package. Both my sound card (Voyetra Audiostation) and CDRW drive (Nero WAV Editor) came with WAV recording/editing software that may do the job. Then compress the WAV with Lame (free).

you can also search for free software: Steinberg Cubasis InWired, Audacity, ProTools, MusicMatch.


Sathyan
 

Mark Shannon

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you can also search for free software: Steinberg Cubasis InWired, Audacity, ProTools, MusicMatch.
I already have MusicMatch (I don't like it, but it's required for my MP3 player). Though I wouldn't mind trying the other suggested products...


Thanks for your help.
 

Mark Shannon

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You may have to go used (ebay, audiogon; I've seen old Dual 'tables for $40 at Goodwill).
I actually go to Goodwill sometimes just to see what old speakers (people sometimes get rid of good ones) or turntables they have...every turntable I've seen there, though, has the head damaged beyond repair or replacement...

I'm not looking for a high end, top of the line turntable... I just want something that will play my records..

On that note, I've found a couple turntables, such as the Sony PS-LX250H ($170CDN) from Future Shop, or the Optimus 42-2023 (on sale right now for $100CDN)

I've also found one for about $130CDN from a local electronics store, though I have no idea what make it is (I'm thinking either Sony or Technics)...

I don't really need one with a preamp, as I don't mind buying one seperatly (and probably wont be putting the music on my computer for a while)

Maybe you could check out the turntables I have provided links for, and tell me how good they would be...

Thanks again for all your help!
 

Sathyan

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They don't have the Optimus 42-2023 at RadioShack in the US so I haven't listened to it. I really doubt the Sony LX250 is $70 CDN better - specs are equivalent. The Optimus is a steal at the price of $100CDN if it is at all tolerable. However, if that $130CDN table is a Technics it will be worth spending the extra $30. Radio Shack has a pretty generous return policy so I'd buy the Optimus while its on sale and test it.

The problem with many cheap record players is they skip excessively on used vinyl (and I'm not going to buy new vinyl at $30 a pop), spin a the wrong speed/evenly, break in normal usage due to poor quality (that Sony has a notoriously bad reputation for build quality). Often these cannot be adjusted by the end user.

Look for the following:
1. tracking - does it skip excessive on old vinyl (you will need to do some cleaning of LP's with DiscWasher or the like in any case)
2. stereo channel separation - on well-recorded vinyl (Blue Note, Deutsche Grammophon, Mercury Living Presence) can you form a mental picture of where the ensemble's instruments are or are they moving about
3. preamp - are transitions to highs and lows smooth (Bach Fugues or Brandenburg Concerti would be good for testing); is there sufficient gain
4. clarity - is there excessive rumbling particularly on quiet passages (use chamber music or acoustic jazz/blues ensembles)
5. natural sound - try a spoken word or female jazz vocalist (whatever the equivalent of Diana Krall, Jane Monheit, or Norah Jones was 30 years ago), does it sound natural?
6. steady speed - cut a piece of cardboard (like a LP cover) 12" in diameter and poke a hole at the center. with a ruler draw a radius line from the center to the edge. place on the platter, switch on the table, don't use the needle, after a couple minutes of rotation time it to see how consistent the speed is
7. build quality - try to assess if it will fall apart - leave it turning for a few days
8. cueing - can the tonearm be cueued w/o scratching the record. on used players i've found the cueing lever the most often part to be broken

one other thing - ask your parents to evaluate - they will know what its supposed to sound like. I (age 25) like you have grown up on CD's and expect a certain sound which vinyl just does not produce. You need to spend US$500+ to come close so don't compare to CD's.

-Sathyan

NP Tina Arena - Don't Ask
 

Mark Shannon

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1. tracking - does it skip excessive on old vinyl
I know my vinyls are old, but they certainly don't show it. They are basically in mint condition. They show no signs of warpage, scratches or use at all, so I think that should be no problem...



Just one more quick question... cassettes don't need a preamp, right?

I appreciate all the help you have given me over hte past few days. Thank you very much!
 

MikeWh

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Mar 3, 2003
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I'm not sure if I misunderstood some of the thread--

Why wouldn't you just use the phono jack on your receiver (which you said you have), then use a line out from the receiver to the audio card's line in? :confused:

Also, my CD-RW came with the ubiquitous Adaptec (now Roxio) Easy CD-Creator, which had a special software filter for recording noisy analog sources, like LPs. I never tried it, as I traded my Technics turntable for a cord of firewood about 7 years ago (true). :D
 

Mark Shannon

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Don't know if anyone's still reading this thread....

just want to update what I said earlier.... the TT I found at a local electronics store (for $130CDN) is not Technics...it's Pioneer...

Is Pioneer a good brand for this type of stuff?
 

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