Receiver's 5-Band Equalizer

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Arron H, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. Arron H

    Arron H Second Unit

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    I have a Yamaha RX-V1200 receiver. It has a 5-band equalizer for the center channel (100HZ, 300HZ, 1kHZ, 3kHZ, and 10kHZ). I'm trying to figure out what blend of the different frequencies will produce the best sounding dialogue for movies and normal TV viewing. Do all receiver's have a built in equalizer? Does anyone have any recommendations for settings? Can anyone explain what each frequency band will emphasize? Thanks for your help, everyone.
     
  2. Arron H

    Arron H Second Unit

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    Forgot to mention - I have a B&W LCR6 center speaker, with 603s up front and 601s for surrounds.
     
  3. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Aaron, good tweaker question.

    I have this Yamaha option, too. I'm sure it's a full Saturday's worth to adjust, listen, adjust listen etc etc.

    The manual suggests one adjusts the center's tonal balance quality to match the mains. Ideally, flat settings do the job, but room size, sound absorption materials, speaker placements, all affect the final tonal balance.

    Does your car stereo have Bass, Mid and High adjustments? Same thing and easier to assess the changes.

    Matching mains and center speakers are supposed to provide "matching timbre." Often, tho, when playing the AVIA disk tones that bounce between the front three and surrounds, the center may sound "higher,' like HISS then HISSSS then HISS. I haven't tried it, but reducing the equalizer at the 3kH range might tone down the center.

    Also, human voice range starts at below 200Hz for male voice to just above 1kHz (female soprano hitting high C). Thus one cud boost the 100Hz and 300Hz bands to see if DVD dialog becomes more pronounced. Of course, the DVD soundtrack engineers supposedly master all these dynamic ranges at the outset.

    But it's something to play with if you have the inclination and like to make graphs.
     
  4. Arron H

    Arron H Second Unit

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    Thanks for the info. I think I will leave the defaults intact for now. I have ordered S&Vs tune up disk. My speakers are supposed to be timbre matched and so, hopefully the test disk will be a good check for this.
     
  5. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    ...good synergism here. I looked at my center EQ and cut back (to flat) the boost I some time ago put in the middle bands, then recalibratede all the speakers.

    Listening real close this time, tho my ears were getting tired, I THINK I detected the center speaker was out of phase! The test disks are good for these discoveries as well as sound levels.
     

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