Receiver with multiple dolby inputs

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Ben_K, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Ben_K

    Ben_K Auditioning

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    I am looking to a dolby capable receiver/amp (at least dolby 5.1) that allows switching between multiple (3+) component video sources, paired with a digital coaxil jack each. Everyone I ask looks at me like I am crazy.

    I have a DVD player w/ Progressive Scan with Dolby digital out. Next I have a digital set top PVR with component video and dolby digital out for HDTV. Finally I have an unnamed videogame console with component video and dolby digital out.

    So, I want a reciever capable of switching these! I just want one unit, no splitters or fancy extra switches. Does such a receiver/amp exist?
     
  2. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Second Unit

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    Sure lots of them. Try a few of the manufacturer's sites and look for spec sheets. Also, specific equipment discussion and recommendations will be found in the AVR portion of the forum.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Yes -but you have to watch for a few things:

    - It used to be only the higher-end recievers ($2500+) had 3 component inputs. There are less-expensive units out now - but they are still in the upper range.

    - Most videophiles say to send the video straight to the television to avoid breaks, loose connections, extra wires.

    - Make sure the reciever has a video bandwidth of 90 Mhz or more. "Component Video" is a 1940's standard and only needs a 12 mhz bandwidth. Progressive and HD video need more.

    - I know you said "no switch box's", but you can get a very good Audio Authority 4:1 switch box that is HD rated (and will switch the optical and coaxial inputs as well) for about $250. This way you only need 1 digital input on a reciever. (Oh, and it learns to switch in sync with your television or reciever remote). Keep this in mind when a salesman shows you a $2,000+ reciever when your budget is $800.

    Good luck and let us know what you end up buying.

    PS: I am going to move this post over to the recievers fourm where the reciever experts hang out. They are all usually helpful.
     
  4. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    Ben,

    you didn't mention a budget, but there's this great sounding Panasonic XR55 ($230, with free shipping from Amazon) that does component switching between 3 sources. (Check out the user reviews on that Amazon page)

    You can download the manual just to make sure.
     
  5. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Many new receivers (e.g. Onkyo TX-SR503) have 3 component ins, though multiple coaxial jacks are somewhat rarer. Perhaps the manufacturers believe that optical jacks are more versatile?
    I don't know if you foresee yourself using HDMI-- such jacks are rare (but not completely unheard of) on low priced gear.
     

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