Receiver with flex bass management, DPL-II, 6.1 processing?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Patrick Sun, Jan 9, 2002.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Is there a receiver that's under $800 that offers those 3 main features (plus the usual 80W/ch or higher, and tons of A/V inputs)?

    If the Denon 2802 had the flexible bass management, I'd be all over it.
     
  2. Kyle_Y

    Kyle_Y Stunt Coordinator

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    What exactly do you mean by flex bass management? My Onkyo 797 can be had for a little over $800 including shipping or tax and it has THX's bass level calibrations etc. Also ,the 797 has 4 optical digital inputs, 3 coaxial digital inputs and one optical digital out, so a lot more digital than a 2802. The 797 also has the ability to have 5 video sources, one more than the Denon. The 797 also has a much stronger amplifier section, proven because of THX certification, if that matters, but the 797 also weighs nearly 50% more than a 2802. I usually do not think weight metters in receivers if it is about 3-5lbs, but the Onkyo weighs over 10lbs more, it has a larger transformer, huge heatsinks, and an internal fan. I'd go with the Onkyo(well, I did).
     
  3. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Oops, sorry. What I mean by flexible bass management (FBM) is the ability to set the crossover frequency (with increment of 10Hz) for the subwoofer/LFE output.

    For example, the Sony ES receivers have FBM in that you can adjust where the receiver sends the low frequency audio portion from all the channels of CD/DVD audio tracks to the subwoofer output, this can be done from 40Hz to 180Hz in 10Hz increments.

    If my subwoofer would work better playing only stuff 60Hz and under, FBM would allow me to set the crossover frequency to 60Hz and my sub would only get the low end audio under 60Hz (with the appropriate roll-off of the crossover on either side of the crossover frequency), and everything above 60Hz would be sent to my other speakers.

    Now if I wanted to raise that crossover point, I need FBM to do it, otherwise, I'm stuck with the manufacturers preset crossover frequency, which can range anywhere from 80Hz to 200Hz in some receivers.

    Unfortunately, the Sony receivers don't provide DPL-II decoding yet, so they don't meet my criteria.
     
  4. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Patrick,
    For the record the DA5ES does have DPLII and DTS:Neo6, etc.,
    it is the only Sony reciever I am aware of that does. It's my lead pick for a reciever at the moment for 2 reasons:
    1) Very flexible bass management, can not only set the x-over in increments of 10Hz, but can set the crossover separately for each channel. So for instance I can set the x-over for my mains at 60Hz and for my center at 90Hz. Sony recievers, (DB and ES models only, IIRC) are the only ones with this level of flexibility under a few grand.
    2) 2 sets of multi-channel inputs. I don't know about you, but I'm planning on having an SACD player and a DVD-A player, and the convenience of being able to hook them both up at once is nice. The only reciever other than a Sony to have this feature is the Denon 5800 (5803 as well, I'd assume), which is obviously in a different league.
    The DA3ES is basically the same from my POV, the major difference being that the DA5ES has DPLII and company, and a RS-232C port for, hopefully, future upgrades. The DA5ES has been reported as being available from authorized dealers for under $1000. This is definately more than the 2802 and 797, but I figured I'd at least give you one option [​IMG]
    Good luck!
    -- Dave
     
  5. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Hmmm....that's intrigueing. I do wish it was in my price range. I'm hoping we'll see some more receiver model options with the feature pack I'm looking for in the springtime (most people should look for all of these features in an effort to "future-proof" their receiver purchase - I know, almost an oxymoron with the way HT technology evolves to rapidly). Thanks for the Sony recommendation.
     
  6. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    The Outlaw 1050 would fit the bill (minus the DPII) I think. Doesn't have 10hz selectible but you can choose between 60hz and 80hz.

    Patrick, why do you really want DPII? What use do you see getting out of it that necessitates its pressence? These two questions are not meant to knock DPII, I'm just not sure if it is a feature I would use as a deal breaker and would like to get your opinion on the topic since I greatly respect it.

    To elaborate, the only real use to me for DPII would be DSS viewing. Given the sound quality on most stations, I just don't think I'd miss it.
     
  7. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    I watch a lot of normal TV programming, most of which is encoded in Dolby Surround, and I figure if I'm going to upgrade my receiver, I'd rather get all the stuff under one roof, rather than get upgrade-fever again if I didn't go for all of the features that I know I would find useful, or regret settling for something less feature-packed if something was available in my price range at the time of my search.
    One more thing, I'm not knocking Outlaw's quality, but I find their aesthetics lacking. If I'm spending a lot of money, it's gotta look nice to me. [​IMG]
    Time was people would buy a receiver and not upgrade for almost 10 years. Nowadays, it seems a receiver's life cycle for a HTFer is 2-3 years. Heh.
     
  8. Andrew Beck

    Andrew Beck Stunt Coordinator

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    [font=http://beck.servebeer.com/ht.html]I don't think recievers go out of fashion as fast as people think. I bought a sony str-de925 in 97 and just upgraded this year. that's a 5 year cylce for that reciever, and I didn't really upgrade for new features (I don't use the added 6.1 processing of the Outlaw 1050), i upgraded for better sound, preouts, s-video switching, and 5.1 channel in; all of which were avaliable in '97. I don't think DPLII is really a big deal, i rarely watch anything on cable that i think surround sound is really necessary for.



    For most people anything that does DD 5.1 and DTS is going to be all they need for the foreseeable future. I don't see 6.1 and 7.1 formats ever taking off as anymore of a niche market for the hobbiests like us. J6P is never going to buy into the extra speakers.



    The only thing that may require an upgrade is the digital audio out for DVD-A/SACD. But until the format wars are settled and a digital output is really finalized (hardware and software) that's not necessary and probably still years away. Not to mention there will be 5.1 analog outs on the players forever.



    I could see myself staying with the Outlaw easily for the next 5+ years, if of course I wasn't on the road to seperates. Even when I make the seperates plunge in the future the outlaw will be a preamp for a while and will probably be replaced with a used 950, which obviously won't have the newest features (10.1? DPL7? or whatever new format they decide we need so we'll keep buying new stuff).



    Andrew
    [/font]
     
  9. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Not only to bump my topic for one last gasp, I just wanted to share the fact that I have a friend looking to get into HT, and was interested in doing it cheap, and I thought if I could get him to buy my current Sony DB930, which has enough bells-n-whistles for him, I would be able to recoup some of the cost and do a receiver upgrade, thus my original post in this thread. But it seems I won't be able to quite get the feature set I want in a new receiver anytime soon.
     

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