Receiver vertical sync problem.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Bane, Jan 6, 2003.

  1. David Bane

    David Bane Extra

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    Actually, I'm not quite sure if the problem is specifically with my receiver.
    I have a Sony STR-DE675 receiver, a Panasonic DVD-RV30 DVD player, a Fisher FVH-4903 VCR and a RCA 20" TV which is about 12 years old. I only use composite video cables and my TV only has composite inputs.
    Whenever I view source material that contains bright flashes of light or flashy edits the picture rolls vertically for a split second which I determined by reading the forums to be a vertical sync error. It happens with the DVD player as well as the VCR (video playback or tuner) which are routed through the receiver to the TV. I don't have the vertical sync problem when I hook a component up directly to the TV, so I think it just might be a compatibility issue. Before I got the Sony STR-DE675 I had a 20 year old audio receiver so I was using an audio/video selector (non-amplified) by Radio Shack and I had the same problem. It might be worth mentioning that I use both regular and gold plated composite cables.
    I think I either have to replace my receiver or TV. Since my receiver is under warranty maybe I can have it repaired. Please, can anyone give me some advice?
     
  2. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer

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    It sounds like your television is showing it's age. You had the problem before you even had the receiver so that all but eliminates it as the source.

    You could get a much better set for pretty cheap (I replaced my parents 15 year old 25" with a $200 27" and it's the difference in night and day).
     
  3. David Bane

    David Bane Extra

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    I think you might be right. But why didn't the TV have the vertical sync problem when I directly connected the DVD player to it? Does the receiver amplify the signal more than the DVD player? Could the length of the cable have anything to do with it?
     
  4. Dave Danek

    Dave Danek Stunt Coordinator

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    I had the same problem you are describing with my old DVD player (pioneer dv606) played thru my denon avr 3200 into a 10 year old toshiba 30" (model escapes me). never had the problem with tv, vhs or LD though. the problem was most noticeable with bright flashes (e.g., during quick cuts in trailers, and also during the cab ride back in time in the movie scrooged). changed cables, no improvement. but when i fed the dvd direct into the tv, that seemed to eliminate the problem. for other reasons, i replaced the pioneer dvd player with a toshiba 4700, and the jumping was far less noticeable. finally upgraded to a denon avr 5700 receiver and do not notice it at all now.

    i think the problem was in the routing thru the old denon receiver. something in that connection was unable to keep up with the quick changes in the picture.

    hope this helps. . .
    dave
     
  5. David Bane

    David Bane Extra

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    I tried a different TV (Toshiba 19") with my current setup and the vertical sync problem was non-existant. I'm now pretty sure that my old TV is to blame. It has always been kind of sensitive (to Macrovision and the like). I hate to think that there is a problem with my receiver because I recently received it as a Christmas present and I enjoy it.
    I'm looking into getting a new TV. A 24". I saw at Best Buy that they have a Sony and a Toshiba (both flat screen). I'm interested in the Toshiba. Anyone have any suggestions as to which one would be better? How good are 24" sets?
     

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