Receiver; to use as switch or not? DVI?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by *Luke*, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. *Luke*

    *Luke* Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    OK, This could be strictly a bunch of opinions or personal preference but here goes....


    Should one put all video sources through the receiver and use it as a switch if possible or only audio and do all direct connects from each video component to the monitor and switch both as necessary?


    Are any manufacturers working on a dual DVI receiver to be able utilize full video switching....for example to use the Denon 5900 (when the DVI can get enabled) through the receiver via DVI? (even the upcoming RX-Z9 Yammy won't have DVI)

    Or in this case is a "multi" switch theory depending on component be the best?

    And in the term "best" I know ther eis ease of function, or less conversions/throughputs etc. so is there really a preferred standard for overall performance?

    Note* please don't kill me if this topic is somewhere else and I missed it. [​IMG]
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Luke, we're not in the habit of killing our members; we prefer that HTF grows rather than contract through attrition.

    I, along with a possible majority or members here, prefer to make video connections directly to the display. Simplicity in the signal chain is best, and allows for fewer chances of signal degradation.

    Not sure what you're asking regarding DVI inputs. Please clarify. Thanks!
     
  3. *Luke*

    *Luke* Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    I havn't seen any receivers with DVI connections to maintain the best possible connection from the component to maintain the receiver as the switch. I too do direct connections to the display, too bad there aren't any high end receivers with strictly audio connections or manufactured both ways to perhaps reduce retail pricing a little by eliminating some in and outputs.
     
  4. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 1999
    Messages:
    4,203
    Likes Received:
    0
    What Luke is looking for is a multi in, one out DVI socket set on the back of a receiver. I am sure that he is not alone there.

    After all, it is the only true digital connector out there. CATV, sat and DVD players whould all have these as outputs.

    Glenn
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Direct is best. But if you have 3 or more sources, or a family, it becomes a real pain to keep the video and audio switched together.

    In the receivers section is a thread about "Inexpensive HD Video Switching". Several of the box's described take both optical and coaxial inputs with each component input, and output BOTH (yes, it converts optical to coaxial and the reverse). With one of these units, your TV stays looking at 1 video feed, your receiver looks at one digital audio feed and you flip between sources with a remote.
     
  6. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Messages:
    8,390
    Likes Received:
    0
    i'm in the other camp. i prefer to route everything through my receiver. i really enjoy the "one-stop" switching capability.

    having to switch the audio at the receiver, then the video at the tv is a pita for me. however many remotes have a macro capability that may get around it...especially if it has discrete codes.

    also, the vibe i get from most of the reviews/articles that i've read also state that there isn't really a difference when routing through the receiver first.

    however, i always advocate that the end-user should try it both ways. if you see any video degredation, then the answer is obvious. if you don't see a difference, then you may appreciate the convenience of routing through the receiver first.

    also, some receivers (like my onkyo) let you do some cool stuff like mix the audio and video sources. i've done this in the past to record a "party vhs" - which had video from cartoons i recorded, but the audio was a mix of songs from my cd collection. kinda cool...
     

Share This Page