receiver for an avid music listener

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Walker, Aug 14, 2002.

  1. David Walker

    David Walker Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've heard amazing things about Marantz and I'm leaning to one of the x200 series models. (probably the 5200 or 6200).

    Are there any other specific models out there I should keep my eye on that are great for music? I've demo'd a Denon 1802, and I just wasn't impressed at all, even though I've heard great things about it's musical reproduction.

    Mainly, I'm looking for reassurance on my Marantz decision, but I certainly don't want to overlook any of its competitors out there. Thanks!

    David
     
  2. JackS

    JackS Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2002
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think a stereo pre/amp combo is what your really looking for. SS or tube is a matter of preference. A slight comprimise might lead you to some integrateds. If your also in need of HT, any inexpensive receiver will fill this need. Good luck, Jack
     
  3. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Depending on your price range, I would suggest you look into an integrated amp. Integrated amps are experiencing a strong come-back, and there are products available from many really good companies. One company I think highly of is Arcam.
     
  4. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    Speakers and room acoustics play a huge part in the final sound. In your budget range (Denon 1802, etc.) I'd suggest a set of quality headphones + headphone amp for optimal music listening.
     
  5. David Walker

    David Walker Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    so you guys don't think one of the Marantz models paired with some good speakers would satisfy a hardcore music listener? I guess most of the A/V receivers are a lot more V and a little less A....
     
  6. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    2,174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  7. David Walker

    David Walker Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, although I don't need it right now, I would eventually like to have some sort of home theater setup. Although that is far down the road, I'd like to get something I can pull that off with. So that would take me out of the 2 channel stereo receiver market
    As for my speakers, I haven't decided which ones to purchase. I'm sure the music quality will depend a lot on my choice in speakers, but I haven't even thought about those yet. (one thing at a time!) [​IMG]
    Also, I'm trying to keep my total costs to around $800 (not including the speakers) Can I accomplish this going with a stereo pre/amp? The respected ones all seem to be priced high.
     
  8. peter_anderson

    peter_anderson Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2001
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    David Walker: I would recommend harman/kardon receivers to you for music listening, while retaining up-to-date home theater capabilities. After owning two h/k receivers and demoing Denon multiple times, I can honestly say that the h/k sound more "musical" on ALL speakers, and generally are a better deal for the features than Marantz.

    If you can put up with the aesthetics, look at the AVR 225 and the AVR 320.
     
  9. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    2,174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you're willing to buy used, you can get many excellent preamps and amps, or integrated amps, for your budget. Even new, there are plenty of choices. If you decide to go that route, let us know and we should be able to help with equipment suggestions. One word of advice - hold off on this decision until you've picked speakers that you like. The speaker choice should drive the amp choice, not the other way around - you don't want to limit your speaker options because you picked a specific amp.
     
  10. Barry_B_B

    Barry_B_B Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  11. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    I agree with this completely.
    I'm only using 2 spkeakers about 70% of the time [​IMG]
     
  12. Rob Rodier

    Rob Rodier Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2002
    Messages:
    538
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  13. David Walker

    David Walker Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    okay, you guys might have swayed me toward the separates route. We'll see...

    Questions though:

    1. should I go integrated or pre/amp? I might be wording this question wrong (I'm not totally savvy in the separates market)

    2. I'm still going to need a A/V receiver hooked up too right?

    3. Are separates going to produce sound THAT much better than, say the Marantz SR6200?

    Thanks!
     
  14. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    2,174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  15. Mal P

    Mal P Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2000
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi David,

    1. Using a separate pre-amp and amp combo will usually yield slightly higher dynamics (bass transients etc) as the pre-amp stage is usually 'active' (as opposed to integrateds, where the pre-amp stage is usually passive).

    2. Yup. I have an old Sony 555ES receiver, whose L/R pre-outputs I plug into an input (say 'aux') on my stereo pre-amp. The pre-amp is then connected to my stereo power-amp, which drives the fronts. The Sony'a amps would drive the rear/centre. A CD player is connected directly to an input on the pre-amp, so the receiver is by-passed for stereo music listening.

    3. The sound quality increase can be exponential over that of a mass-market Japanese receiver. The amp made a significant difference, but the pre-amp was astounding.

    Cheers,
    Mal
     
  16. Michael WB

    Michael WB Auditioning

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2002
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I can't really comment on the prices since I live in Denmark and don't know the prices in the US. But here Marantz is cheaper than HK and Denon.

    Earlier this year I bought a SR4200. I choose that because of the way it sounded with music, and since I don't have room for a 6.1 or 7.1 system and because I knew I would ad an external amp there was no reason to by one of the bigger models.

    I have bought a secondhand Denon POA-2400 2-channel amp (2x200w) which is driving my main speakers and helped improve the stereo sound.

    The SR4200 and POA-2400 cost me 6.300 DKK which is roughly 800 USD. I'm sure you can do something similar and probably for less money.

    When that's said I must agree with Rob. Find the speakers you want first and then by the electronics that match.

    Michael
     
  17. David Walker

    David Walker Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If the amp is going to be doing all the work, will I even need a great receiver? I would assume not.

    Also, if I decide to go integrated, what exactly have I decided to do. Meaning, what do you mean when you say "integrated"? Is that still considered separates? Or does integrated mean all-in-one unit, AKA an A/V receiver?

    Last question, I would assume I'm going to have to buy a tuner separate too right? If so, it looks like going the separtes route can get pretty pricey fast...

    (I gotta get the basic knowledge figured out before I can decide much further...)

    Thanks!
     
  18. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    2,174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    An integrated amp usually combines the preamp stage (source selection, volume control, mute, balance, bass/treble, etc.) and the power amp stage (the part that drives the speakers). A tuner is usually not included. You could get a stereo receiver, which wouldn't have the A/V processing but would include a tuner.
    As far as price, I would buy a standalone tuner. If you don't absolutely need to be able to store stations in memory, I'd go for a 70s analog tuner - you can get them on eBay for as little as $25, and some of the Pioneers/Sansuis from that era sound way better than any tuner you'll find bundled with a receiver today. Even if you must have a digital tuner, a little research should turn up good stuff that you can buy. For instance, I seem to remember that the Yamaha "Natural Sound" tuners (or whatever they were called) were supposed to have good sound. I'm using a 70s Pioneer, and on some stations it sounds almost as good as my CD player. I'd never heard soundstage depth on a radio program before.
    It boils down to how much you're willing to pay for what you want, and that's a decision only you can take [​IMG] In general, as you pack more functionality into the same box, your total expenditure goes down, and usually so does sound quality.
     
  19. Craig_Kg

    Craig_Kg Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2002
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would have thought a competant amp would be able to drive a wide range of speakers (not talking about 'stats here). Getting the best amp would then give you the widest choice in speakers.

    An integrated amp has just a preamp and an amplifier stage - it's not separates be would sound much closer to that than a HT receiver. A stereo receiver (which also has a tuner) would also sound much better than a HT receiver as it doesn't have all the complex processing circuitry in the signal path and there are less devices fitted in the cost.

    With a good stereo setup, you can later add HT by getting more speakers and a HT receiver that has at least stereo preouts (which the Denon 1802 does). A secondhand stereo integrated amp or receiver should be quite affordable and easy to find.
     
  20. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    Why not just go and LISTEN to some integrateds first, in different price ranges, and see if they are what you want. If you are not looking for true audiophile level sound reproduction, then many of the higher up receivers from the major manufacturers do tend to cover most people's needs. My system doesn't give me music as well as I would like, but it does a very good job for what I paid and I am satisfied with it for now. I believe I have come to the conclusion that I may eventually have to have a separate 2ch setup just for music.
     

Share This Page