Receiver feature needed

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike Newt, Jan 4, 2003.

  1. Mike Newt

    Mike Newt Auditioning

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    I am looking to upgrade my receiver in the near future. One problem I have is that my current speakers are 6 ohm, and when I upgrade them, I may choose 8 ohm ones. What feature would I need to be able to replace some of my speakers with ones having a different impedance?
     
  2. Jose G

    Jose G Supporting Actor

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    From what I understand, you simply need to get a receiver that can handle both 8 and 6 ohm impedance, like all of the HK's. Other brands do this just as well, while others not so well, so I'll let others who know more about it give you more specifics as to which brands are best for this. I do know that the HK.s can handle this without a problem- even when using both types of speakers at the same time. The thing to watch for is if the receiver runs too hot when using let's say a 6 or 4 ohm speaker- it may shut off, especially if it doesn't have a built in fan. But again, I believe that if you are looking into receivers costing about $300+, they should work fine with both 6 and 8 ohm speakers. By the way, just make sure that when you research the power rating of the receiver that you look for the ohm rating that matches the speakers, so you can make the best choices. Now let's here what the experst have to say.
     
  3. Mike Newt

    Mike Newt Auditioning

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    Thanks. I will be looking in the $700-$1000 range, and I will probably, at some point in time, have a mix of impedances at the same time. This may occur in the same or different rooms, depending on how I choose to upgrade the speakers.

    You mentioned power ratings, is there a way to adjust the power levels for each speaker, say have one level for center and surrounds, and another for front?
     
  4. Jose G

    Jose G Supporting Actor

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    By power rating I meant the power per channel that your receiver puts out. Therefore, you need to look at the power rating of the speakers to make sure they don't get under or over powered by the receiver and damage the speakers. Less power, by the way, is usually worse- causing clipping which can damage the speakers. But like I said, high end machine like the ones you will be considering should handle the different ohms without a problem.
    As far as calibrating the speakers (adjusting the level of each speaker), most if not all A/V receivers will do this.
    If you are talking different rooms powered by one receiver- than you should be looking into multizone receivers, some which even allow you to play different sources of music at the same time in two seperate locations- also within your budget.
    The HTF primer is a great read for all the basics. I learned a lot from it. HTF Primer
     
  5. Jose G

    Jose G Supporting Actor

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    Oops. Mike, I thought you were a newer member, so forgive me if you already knew about the primer. And actually, I don't remember if the primer covers the different ohm speakers running off the same receiver at the same time question or speaks to multizone receivers. I probably just picked up all that stuff from reading and talking about here on the forum.
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Yeah, there should be absolutely no problem at all running 8 ohm speakers. Thats the most normal ohm rating anyway. The thing to understand is that this is like and "average" resistance, it can dip way above, and way below this depending on whats playing, the frequency etc. etc. Too low an ohm rating, can tax inferior amps. Theoretically, if your current speaker are 6 ohms, and the new ones will be 8, the danger is more in the 6 ohm ones, because of less resistance, though any amp should MORE than handle that, and who knows what the resistance curve is like on either of those. It should not be a worry at all, and no features are needed at all. Any HT receiver at 700-1000 bucks should MORE than be able to handle 6 ohm, and even 4 oh with ease. And if you're talking a 2-channel receiver, dont waste your time thinking about it. I'm sure a 2-channel receiver at that price would handle a great deal very well.
     
  7. Guy Usher

    Guy Usher Supporting Actor

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    When you buy a new receiver just make sure it will handle a 4ohm speaker load, look at the specs typicaly it will say something like rated power [email protected]/[email protected] you want to see a large increase in power (up to double) for 4ohm speakers, some will give you the same power rating for both 8 and 4ohm loads, they are telling you that you can run a 4ohm speaker but I would acoid it and look for the one with the large increase. Virtually all will run 6 or 8ohm speakers so if you buy a receiver that is rated for 4ohm speakers you will be in good shape. You will at least have the confidence that you can run just about any home speaker on the market.
    Of course there are exceptions to every rule and I gave you a very simple answer to problem that is not always so simple, however a little research on the front end will always pay off in the end. At least you are thinking about this issue, I think too many people are blind when shopping for audio componets, even though you can return it it is still a pain in the rear. . .
     
  8. Mike Newt

    Mike Newt Auditioning

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    Thanks to all for the replies. I'm not too knowledgeable about impedance and speaker designs other than knowing it affects the power an amplifier outputs. I did look at some owners manuals online at Denon and Onkyo (3802 & 797). Both seemed to be capable of dealing with a mix of 6 and 8 ohm speakers and it looked like I could adjust the sound levels to appropriately match the different speakers.
     
  9. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    You should not worry about impedences. Guy makes a good point about 4 ohm speakers, although it isnt very applicable in your situation, because you are going from 6 to 8 ohm speakers. You should have no problems whatsoever. Also, its not the impedance that affects how loud a speaker will be. You should look more at the sensitivity rating, given in some units of dB/watt/meters. This value will say that at one watt, at one meter away, the speaker will produce x decibals of sound. Usually, matching speakers from the same manufacturer and series, will be very close in sensitivity, so that adjustments are minimal. Also, distances from the listening position will also necesitate adjustments. If all your speakers are exactly the same models, so that they are the same sensitivity, timbre matched, and the same ohms, if some are closer or farther away from the listening position, you'd have to adjust anyway. I guess my word of advice, is, if you're looking at 6 or 8 ohm speakers, dont worry a thing about ohm ratings. Also, don't worry about sensitivity ratings, because assuming you are buying matched speakers from the same manufacturer and line, or even similar lines, the sensitivities will be similar if not the same. Of course, the most important part of the speaker is the sound, not the numbers that accompany it.
     

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