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Receiver decoder vs. DVD decoder (1 Viewer)

Jeff Hoak

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Jun 26, 2001
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1) I've done some searching on this forum about this and either I'm searching on the wrong expressions or it hasn't been addressed in a while.

2) Mods... If this is in the wrong area please feel free to move it wherever you see fit.

The question... I have a Sony STR-DB940 and a Panasonic RP91. Both devices will decode DD 5.1 & DTS. Which should I be using to decode my DD 5.1 & DTS DVDs? More importantly. why?

I know that using the DB940 exclusively would require only a single setup (and calibration) to listen to DVD and HDTV (supplied by my DST-3000) but an addtitonal setup (the RP91) isn't an issue for me.

THANX!
 

Alf S

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Hey Jeff,

I believe the "standard" hook up for your situation is to use the receiver to decode. I don't really know of anyone who uses their DVD player anymore to decode 5.1. Back in the "old" days when most receivers relied on a DVD to decode stuff, many folks had no choice but use the DVD decoder.

Now though it's probably best to let the receiver do the work. At one time DVD decoders weren't as reliable at reproducing the "best" surround effect. They are probably equal in quality now, but having to buy all the extra cables to achieve 5.1 using the DVD decoder is probably not worth the trouble or cost. Plus you always run into the chance that one of the wires or connections isn't 100% and therefore not giving you the best decoding possible. Why add one extra step in the final surround sound loop anyway.

In my opinion, I'd stick with the simplist method, in this case, use the receiver.

Good luck!

Alfer
 

Vince Maskeeper

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The question... I have a Sony STR-DB940 and a Panasonic RP91. Both devices will decode DD 5.1 & DTS. Which should I be using to decode my DD 5.1 & DTS DVDs? More importantly. why?
Jeff,

This is an interesting question indeed! First, I'll start out right off by saying there is no correct answer. I can't say for sure which approach is better for you, or even better globally- but I can offer some possible things to consider when choosing.

1) Bass Management. Majority of receivers bypass bass management when you come in via the 6 channel input (which you would use if you were decoding in the DVD player)-- and many of the players with decoding built in have little or no bass management control.

Obviously you'd have to examine your particular needs in this department, and examine what options the player offers- and see which method gives you get better control.

2) Conversion Quality. The golden eared among us can often tell a difference between different brands of D/A conversion. In the case of choosing between where you're doing the conversion, obviously you're choosing which converter you will use to get your audio.

If it's possible to setup different speaker settings for the 6 channel input and your digital input on your receiver- I would suggest setting it up both ways and trying to A-B testing to see if you can tell a difference in conversion quality-- you might be surprised at what you find!

3) Configuration. I know many users of the RP-91 are trying out the world of DVD-A discs. In order to use DVD-A discs, you have to use the 6 channel output from the player (the DVD-A signal cannot yet be decoded via a digital connection to a receiver).

So this becomes an issue. Are you interested in DVD-A? If so, you're probably best to wire and calibrate your system using the 6 channel input on the receiver. IF not, it is probably easier to hook up your system using a single digital cable, rather than 6 channels of analog signal cables.

Hope that helps a little

Vince
 

Jeff Hoak

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Jun 26, 2001
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137
It's probably pretty naïve but I can't seem to get past the "cost" aspect of it all.

The receiver and the DVD cost just about the same amount. When I consider what tasks each is being asked to acomplish I can't help but believe that the DVD is bound to have the better decoder "chip-set".

Vince,

Thanx... The DVD-A aspect of the equation had not yet occured to me. At this point I do not own and DVD-A discs. I haven't really had any interest but I certainly hadn't ruled them out either.

The OBVIOUS answer is to hook it up and let my ears decide. It's a shame I'm so blessed lazy...
 

Vince Maskeeper

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Well- certainly you have a point, especially if your receiver is valued equally with your dvd player. Actually, technically speaking, in your case- you have a higher-mid range DVD player and a lower end receiver-- so you will probably find the DVD convertors to be a little nicer... In my case, my receiver cost 3 times the price of a dvd player- so I trust it to do the work.

But, always- trust your ears. Educated guess might lead you to believe the RP-91 convertors are better than a budget receiver- but I'd personally fiddle a bit before I made that determinations.

-V
 

Rory

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Joined
Oct 16, 2002
Messages
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Hi folks,

Just want to be sure I got this right.

I have a Denon AVR-2802 receiver and a Mitsu DD-8020 DVD player. If I use the Mitsu 5.1 analog out to the Denon ext. in (currently only used for DVD-Audio), I will be using the Mitsu DTS/Dolby decoders. If I use the Mitsu coax or optical digital out to the Denon optical/coax digital in, I will be using the Denon's DTS/Dolby decoders. Is that correct?

I currently have both ways connected. If the above is correct, I should just use the connection that sounds best to me and leave it at that. Right?

I just want to make sure I know what I'm doing.

Now I'll go see if I can find answers to my "delay" questions.

Cheers!
 

Michael Reuben

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The receiver and the DVD cost just about the same amount. When I consider what tasks each is being asked to acomplish I can't help but believe that the DVD is bound to have the better decoder "chip-set".
It's more likely the opposite. A receiver is primarily about sound. If the manufacturer wants to cut corners, it's often in the video pass-through circuitry. A DVD player is primarily about video, because the manufacturers know that most people will be using their receiver to do the decoding. If corners are going to be cut in a DVD player, it's probably in the audio circuitry.
But as others have said, listen to both and judge for yourself.
M.
 

Rory

Grip
Joined
Oct 16, 2002
Messages
22
Thanks for your reply.

I'm still confused. What you're saying is that by using the Mitsu's 5.1 analog out to the Denon's 5.1 ext. analog in, I'm using the Denon's decoders? And by using the Mitsu's coax/optical digital out to the Denon's coax/optical digital in, I'm using the Mitsu's decoders? Isn't that backwards? I thought anything that goes into the external jack by-passes the decoders, tone, etc. of the Denon. Also, if my Mitsu is DVD-Audio able, and to use the DVD-Audio I must use the 5.1 analog out, wouldn't that mean it's using its own decoder?

I'm sort of thick today.

Happy Turkey Day!
 

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