receiver crossover or dvd player crossover?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by al lout, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. al lout

    al lout Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all, I'm currently have JBL studio speakers and DIY Tempest Sub. Running them with Yamaha HTR 5560 receiver and Pioneer 563A dvd player. I'm using an optical cable to connect my player to receiver. I believe that the pio player has a very high crossover like around 200hz? And my Yamaha has a default crossover at 90hz. My question is should I use my receiver to decode digital signal since it has a better crossover? Currently, I have my Pio 563A decodes digital signals (another word, I turned on Digital out, DTS out, DD out on my dvd player). On the Yamaha I left it as default... I don't see any options on the Yamaha to turn off the decoder... I'm kinda lost... which one is doing the decoding now? the Pio or the Yamaha? How can I switch one on only??? Please help... Thanks!

    Al,
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    If you're only using an optical cable between the player and the receiver you're only using the receiver's decoder, which is usually better than that of the player. If you want to use the player for SACD or DVD-A you need to run cables from the analog outs on the player to the pre-ins on the receiver, in which case you'll be using the player's decoder.

    When you turned on Digital Out, DTS out and DD out all you were doing was enabling the player to output those digital bitstreams to the reciever for decoding. DTS is usually disabled as shipped because a DTS bitstream plays havoc with a non-dts capable decoder.
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    You can't actually turn decoders "off" on your receiver, they only opperate when fed a signal the receiver can decode via a digital connection (DD, DTS, etc...). These are NOT DSPs, they are actuall surround formats and MUST be decoded either by the player or receiver. When using a digital connection, the receiver is ALWAYS doing the decoding.

    As Steve mentions, to utilize hires audio capability of this player, you need to use the analog outputs to the receiver's multi-channel analog input. Analog signals are already decoded by the player and the receiver is just functioning as preamp and amp. Generally when using this type of connection; no DSPs or tone controlls are available (a good thing usually).
     
  4. al lout

    al lout Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you, guys... Now it's all clear up...

    Al,
     

Share This Page