Receiver as video switch - what impact does composite video bandwidth have?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Richard C, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. Richard C

    Richard C Extra

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    OOPs. Title should say "component video"...

    That "read this first thread" is great! But there's one question I still have for which I can't find an answer.

    I've bought a new Sony KF42WE610 and Denon DVD1600 - both to be delivered next week.

    I understand that my current Denon 2500 A/V receiver is hopelessly outdated with only Dolby Pro-logic. So, I'm going to replace it.

    I love that receiver from an audio standpoint (I have it driving Kef Q70s for music) and it has served me well for the basic HT I have now. (Kef center speaker and Polk Audio surrounds with a Velodyne sub.

    It also has served me as a video switch, which is important since my kid's grandparents need to be able to simply change from TV to VCR to DVD - pushing one button has been ideal.

    Initially, I'm looking at two Denon recievers to replace, the 2803 and 1804. Biggest question is this.

    The 1804 says is has 2 component inputs with assignable bandwidth of 27 (perhaps 30. Depends on the version of literature I'm reading).

    The 2803 has 2 component inputs with assignable bandwidth of 100.

    How will that impact me? Are either of those adequate to use as a video switch with both DVD and HDTV signals? What does assignable bandwidth really mean in this case?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Richard.

    Most people save the complexity by wireing directly to the TV from the HD video sources. A inexpensive remote control can be used to keep the TV and receiver in sync with a single button push for each device.

    While it's not a good idea to run Progressive/HD video through a receiver unless it is HD rated, it WILL appear to work. There will be a loss of focus and some other problems, but nothing will be damaged.

    This thread on
    Inexpensive HD Video Switching has a lot of good information, and several product recomendations for external switchers for about $150 that will learn from your remote to keep the audio & video in sync. If the price difference between the 1804 & 2803 is more than $150, these would be a good alternative. (And the switch box's give you 4 inputs, not just 2 - remember you may have a DVD player, HD cable box and a XBox - all of which provide a progressive/HD signal).

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Richard C

    Richard C Extra

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    Bob,

    That helps a whole lot. The remote solution does seem to be a simple yet great one. Passes the grandparent test yet removes potential sources of degradation from the setup.

    Appreciate the switch link as well. The AVR price difference is $300, so that will be a worthwhile read.

    Many Thanks!
     

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