rear speaker & sub questions

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by ben kwok, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. ben kwok

    ben kwok Auditioning

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    Currently I have b&w dm303 box shelf speakers for fronts, a denon AVR 1601 receiver, a klipsh sub, and a pair of old sony apm x270 speakers (I don't know what to do with the sonys).

    In the long run I intend to get B&W all around... so I'm missing the center ch and the rear speakers. From what I've read i could just get a matching pair of dm303's for the rears as well. When I got those I think I paid $300. I'm assuming the price today isn't much different. Based on price range I'm probably going to get the same for rears. Or would any of you advise otherwise?

    I've always had the impression rear speakers were typically never as good as your mains are supposed to be. I basically don't want to over pay for a component. Can someone elaborate?

    lastly... my sub settings. There's a low pass setting, an in-phase setting, and also 2 different speaker connection types (line in vs speaker in). Can anyone explain or point me to information on these options?
     
  2. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    Getting DM303s all around will make your surround sound more integrated. So when a sound effect travels around or pass your 5.1 system, it won't change in pitch or tone like it might if you had different speakers in the rear. If you bought cheap small speakers as surrounds and a train sound effect was traveling from front to back... it might sound like the train gets smaller once the sound starts coming from your rear speakers.

    I'd say its better to have the same speakers all around or at least matched speakers. (Timbre matched)

    For your sub..

    Low Pass might make your sub play deeper frequencies or make it play higher frequencies depending on the setting.

    In-phase setting might switch the positive and negative wires connecting to your sub so instead of your woofer pushing then pulling, it will pull then push. This setting is used to match your main speakers so the sub and mains don't cancel eachother out.

    line in is the signal from your receiver with RCA type cables. Speaker in is used if you must connect your speaker outputs of your receiver (left and right fronts) to your subwoofer because you don't have an subwoofer out on your receiver. So use the line in if you can, connected to your LFE or subwoofer out on your receiver.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    As Chris noted, you’ll get the best sound using the same speakers all the way around. However, some people with large and expensive front speakers will opt for a smaller rear speaker. Typically, however, it will be a smaller version from the same model line (i.e., same tweeter, smaller version of the same woofer). You don’t have that option with the DM303’s, though.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. ben kwok

    ben kwok Auditioning

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    thanks for the responses everyone. I found it very informative.
     
  5. Fran Lu

    Fran Lu Extra

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    If you want to go with in-walls, I'm thinking about going with the CWM200s for surrounds that use the same drivers as the 303s.
     

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