Directors Rate the Hitchcocks

Discussion in 'Movies' started by MartinTeller, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. MartinTeller

    MartinTeller Screenwriter

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    A thread over in Software got me curious about how other people rank the various Hitchcock films. Here's how I look at them:

    Top tier:
    Vertigo
    Rear Window
    North by Northwest
    The Birds
    The 39 Steps
    Shadow of a Doubt

    2nd tier: (slightly flawed but still immensely enjoyable)
    Psycho
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    The Lady Vanishes
    Rope
    Notorious
    Rebecca
    Sabotage
    Foreign Correspondent
    Dial M for Murder
    The Trouble With Harry
    Young and Innocent
    Strangers on a Train

    3rd tier: (problematic, but worth watching)
    Marnie
    Frenzy
    Saboteur (would be 2nd tier if Robert Cummings weren't so lame)
    Lifeboat
    Spellbound
    To Catch a Thief

    4th tier: (don't enjoy much at all)
    Topaz
    Torn Curtain
    The Paradine Case
    The Lodger


    The rest I either haven't seen or don't remember seeing.
     
  2. Kirk Tsai

    Kirk Tsai Screenwriter

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    Still missing a bunch of his,

    Notorious
    North By Northwest
    Rebecca

    Psycho
    Shadow of a Doubt
    Strangers on a Train
    Vertigo
    The 39 Steps

    Rear Window
    Suspicion
    Rope
    The Lady Vanishes
    Marnie
    The Birds
    Saboteur
    Frenzy

    Spellbound
    Dial M for Murder
    To Catch a Thief
    The Trouble with Harry
    The Wrong Man
    Torn Curtain
     
  3. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Top tier:

    Vertigo
    Rear Window
    Psycho
    The 39 Steps
    Shadow of a Doubt
    Foreign Correspondent

    2nd tier: (slightly flawed but still immensely enjoyable)

    The Lady Vanishes
    Frenzy
    Lifeboat
    Notorious
    Rebecca
    Strangers on a Train
    Rope

    3rd tier: (problematic, but worth watching)

    The Trouble With Harry
    Sabotage
    Saboteur
    Spellbound
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)


    4th tier: (don't enjoy much at all)
    Marnie
    Dial M for Murder
    To Catch a Thief
    Topaz
    Torn Curtain
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
     
  4. Steve Christou

    Steve Christou Long Member

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    There's nothing flawed about Psycho, it's Hitchcock's masterpiece.


    Psycho
    North by Northwest
    Rear Window (my personal favorite of his films)
    Vertigo
    Rebecca
    The Lady Vanishes

    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    Notorious
    Foreign Correspondent
    Strangers on a Train
    The Birds
    Shadow of a Doubt
    The 39 Steps

    Saboteur
    To Catch a Thief
    Dial M For Murder
    Spellbound
     
  5. Kristian

    Kristian Supporting Actor

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    I have a lot of Hitchcock films left to see, but I'll rank what I've seen, anyways:

    Top Tier

    North by Northwest
    Strangers on a Train
    The Birds



    2nd Tier

    Notorious
    Lifeboat



    3rd Tier

    Marnie
    Spellbound



    4th Tier

    Dial M For Murder
    Blackmail
     
  6. Cary T

    Cary T Screenwriter

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    How can anyone(Kirk) rank Rear Window in the third tier?!

    Top Tier
    Rear Window
    Psycho
    Rebecca
    Vertigo
    The Lady Vanishes

    2nd Tier(Great to good, but not in the same class as the top tier)
    Rope
    The Birds
    Frenzy
    North By Northwest
    Strangers on a Train
    Notorious
    Spellbound
    Shadow of a Doubt
    The 39 Steps
    Saboteur
    The Trouble with Harry

    3rd Tier
    Family Plot
    The Man Who Knew Too Much(1956)
    To Catch A Thief

    4th Tier (The Hitch's I didn't like)
    Topaz
    Torn Curtain
    Marnie
     
  7. Kirk Tsai

    Kirk Tsai Screenwriter

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    How can most people not see the utter brilliance of Notorious I don't know either. FWIW, I tried to rank them in order, so Rear Window is still among my 9 favorite Hitchcocks.
     
  8. Steve Christou

    Steve Christou Long Member

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    I love Notorious, but I had to single out 5-6 super classics and it just missed out.

    You know this thread would have had more action in the Movies section, it's wasted in the Polls.

    Hitchcock remains my favorite movie director, no other director comes close.
    He's made more great films than any other director in cinema history IMO.
     
  9. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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    Top tier:

    The 39 Steps
    The Lady Vanishes
    Strangers on a Train
    The Birds
    Psycho
    The Trouble With Harry
    Suspicion
    Shadow of a Doubt
    Rear Window
    North by Northwest
    Rebecca
    Notorious
    Rope
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    To Catch a Thief
    Vertigo

    2nd tier:

    Lifeboat
    Marnie
    Saboteur
    Spellbound
    Blackmail

    3rd tier:

    Sabotage
    Secret Agent
    The Paradine Case
    Frenzy
    Family Plot
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    Murder!
    Number 17
    The Ring
    The Lodger
    Stage Fright
    Foreign Correspondent
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith

    4th Tier:

    Jamaica Inn
    Under Capricorn
    The Wrong Man
    I Confess
    Topaz
    Torn Curtain
     
  10. MartinTeller

    MartinTeller Screenwriter

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    I'm surprised that Dial M for Murder is being ranked so low (and more surprised that George apparently hasn't seen it).



    It probably would have been moved here anyway.
     
  11. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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    Just a typo on my part. I've definitely seen it, and think quite a bit of it - I'd actually put it in Tier 1, although I have to admit that 4 tiers isn't enough, I could easily subset each of these (e.g., Dial M for Murder is nowhere as good as Rear Window, although it's still top-notch Hitchcock).
     
  12. Jim_K

    Jim_K Executive Producer

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    Masterworks

    Psycho
    Vertigo
    Rear Window
    North by Northwest
    Notorious
    The Birds

    Excellent

    Shadow of a Doubt
    Foreign Correspondent
    Suspicion
    Rebecca
    Strangers on a Train
    Dial M for Murder
    Rope

    Good

    The Lady Vanishes
    Spellbound
    To Catch a Thief
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    The Lodger
    Saboteur
    Marnie
    The Paradine Case
    Blackmail

    Average

    The 39 Steps
    Frenzy
    Lifeboat
    Sabotage
    The Wrong Man
    Young and Innocent
    Bon Voyage
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    Secret Agent
    Stage Fright
    I Confess
    Number Seventeen
    Jamaica Inn


    Poor

    The Trouble with Harry
    Family Plot
    Torn Curtain
    Topaz
    Under Capricorn
    The Skin Game
     
  13. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    I’m wondering how many who have ranked Dial M for Murder have seen it in 3D? It remains my choice for 3D films even though I would probably place in the 2nd tier.
     
  14. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    Top Tier
    Rear Window (my favorite)
    Vertigo
    Notorious
    Psycho

    Second Tier
    Rebecca
    Spellbound

    Third Tier
    Marnie
    The Birds

    The jury is still out on this one
    North by Northwest
     
  15. Angelo.M

    Angelo.M Producer

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    Love 'em:

    Rear Window
    North by Northwest
    Notorious
    The 39 Steps
    Vertigo


    Like 'em:

    Rebecca
    The Birds
    Strangers on a Train
    Rope
    To Catch a Thief
    Suspicion
    The Man Who Knew Too Much
    ('50s)
    Dial M for Murder


    Coulda been contenders:

    Lifeboat
    Saboteur
    The Trouble with Harry
    Foreign Correspondent


    Doesn't work for me:

    Psycho (sorry)
     
  16. MartinTeller

    MartinTeller Screenwriter

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    Oh heck, don't feel obligated to use my system. Rank 'em in whatever way makes the most sense to you.
     
  17. Kristian

    Kristian Supporting Actor

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    I've only seen it in 2D, but I don't think watching it in 3D would make much of a difference. The visuals are not the reason I rank it so low; it's the story and the pacing.
     
  18. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

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    Masterworks

    Psycho
    Rear Window
    Vertigo
    Rebecca
    The Birds
    Blackmail

    Excellent

    Notorious
    Marnie
    North By Northwest
    The Lady Vanishes
    Shadow of a Doubt

    Good

    Secret Agent
    The 39 Steps
    To Catch a Thief
    The Lodger
    The Skin Game
    Strangers On A Train
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    The Farmer's Wife
    Saboteur
    Topaz
    Juno and the Paycock

    Average

    Frenzy
    Sabotage
    Aventure Malgache
    Bon Voyage
    Number Seventeen

    Poor

    The Trouble with Harry
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
     
  19. MartinTeller

    MartinTeller Screenwriter

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    Hmm, ratings for Blackmail are all over the map. I'll have to check that one out for myself.
     
  20. Steve Christou

    Steve Christou Long Member

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    I started a Hitchcock thread 3 years ago on the HTF which was my longest running thread at that time. I posted a list of Hitchcock cameos on it, here it is...

    THE 39 STEPS (1935): Tossing some litter while Robert Donat and Lucie Mannheim run from the theater, seven minutes into the movie.

    YOUNG AND INNOCENT (1938): Outside the courthouse, holding a camera.

    THE LADY VANISHES (1938): Very near the end of the movie, in Victoria Station, wearing a black coat and smoking a cigarette.

    REBECCA (1940): Walking near the phone booth in the final part of the film just after George Sanders makes a call.

    FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT (1940): Early in the movie, after Joel McCrea leaves his hotel, wearing a coat and hat and reading a newspaper.

    MR. AND MRS. SMITH (1941): Midway through, passing Robert Montgomery in front of his building.

    SUSPICION (1941): mailing a letter at the village postbox about 45 minutes in.

    SABOTEUR (1942): Standing in front of Cut Rate Drugs in New York as the saboteur's car stops, an hour in.

    SHADOW OF A DOUBT (1943): On the train to Santa Rosa, playing cards.

    LIFEBOAT (1944): In the "before" and "after" pictures in the newspaper ad for Reduco Obesity Slayer.

    SPELLBOUND (1945): Coming out of an elevator at the Empire Hotel, carrying a violin case and smoking a cigarette, 40 minutes in.

    NOTORIOUS (1946): At a big party in Claude Rains's mansion, drinking champagne and then quickly departing, an hour after the film begins.

    THE PARADINE CASE (1947): Leaving the train and Cumberland Station, carrying a cello.

    ROPE (1948): His trademark can be seen briefly on a neon sign in the view from the apartment window.

    UNDER CAPRICORN (1949): In the town square during a parade, wearing a blue coat and brown hat, in the first five minutes. Ten minutes later, he is one of three men on the steps of Government House.

    STAGE FRIGHT (1950): Turning to look at Jane Wyman in her disguise as Marlene Dietrich's maid.

    STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951): Boarding a train with a double bass fiddle as Farley Granger gets off in his hometown, early in the film.

    I CONFESS (1953): Crossing the top of a staircase after the opening credits.

    DIAL M FOR MURDER (1954): On the left side of the class-reunion photo, thirteen minutes into the film.

    REAR WINDOW (1954): Winding the clock in the songwriter's apartment, a half hour into the movie.

    TO CATCH A THIEF (1955): Ten minutes in, sitting to the left of Cary Grant on a bus.

    THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY (1955): Walking past the parked limousine of an old man who is looking at paintings, twenty minutes into the film.

    THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956): Watching acrobats in the Moroccan marketplace (his back to the camera) just before the murder.

    THE WRONG MAN (1956): Narrating the film's prologue.

    VERTIGO (1958): In a gray suit walking in the street, eleven minutes in.

    NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959): Missing a bus during the opening credits.

    PSYCHO (1960): Four minutes in, through Janet Leigh's window as she returns to her office. He is wearing a cowboy hat.

    THE BIRDS (1963): Leaving the pet shop with two white terriers as Tippi Hedren enters.

    MARNIE (1964): Entering from the left of the hotel corridor after Tippi Hedren passes by, five minutes in.

    TORN CURTAIN (1966): Early in the film, sitting in the Hotel d'Angleterre lobby with a blond baby.

    TOPAZ (1969): Being pushed in a wheelchair in an airport, half an hour in. Hitchcock gets up from the chair, shakes hands with a man, and walks off to the right.

    FRENZY (1972): In the center of a crowd, wearing a bowler hat, three minutes into the film; he is the only one not applauding the speaker.

    FAMILY PLOT (1976): In silhouette through the door of the Registrar of Births and Deaths, 41 minutes into the movie.
     

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