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Raiders: Ford forgotten

Discussion in 'Movies' started by ABritch, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

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    Then I guess "these kids today" started being horrible a couple decades before the internet because when I was a kid in the 80's, I didn't know anyone (other than myself) that had much interest in anything from the past. While that's a small sampling, I can't imagine my town was any different from any other at the time.
     
  2. Message #22 of 69 Sep 24, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2019
    Nick*Z

    Nick*Z Screenwriter

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    Addendum to my previous post: a few years ago, when Jeff Foxworthy hosted 'Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader' a young woman stood on the podium, shown a picture of what was so transparently an image of the Titanic sinking, painted by Ken Marschall and asked to identify it. She came up with 'the Hindenburg' as her reply. If she had come up with any other sea-faring vessel that had tragically sunk, I would have given her props. But not even aware that the Hindenburg was an 'air ship' not a luxury liner already put her in my black book as a dunder-head.

    The young woman, in her early twenties, then went on to compound her public display of idiocy when asked 'In what country would you find the capital city of Budapest?' Unable to answer, she polled the fifth grader, who pointed out that the country in question was Hungary, to which the woman, utterly dazed and confused replied, "You're hungry?" "No," the fifth grader replied, with a note of annoyance, "Hungary...it's a country in Europe!" The kicker - the woman replied, "I thought Europe was a country!"

    Now, what do we make of these exchanges? Well, first of all, the woman, her parents, her education system and virtually all of her extended family and friends ought to have been summarily horse-whipped because they had succeeded in raising, molding and fostering a manifestly irresponsible individual, of sufficient age - presumably to take her place in the adult world - yet, tragically, unequipped to enter it and, to paraphrase F. Scott Fitzgerald, 'was so dumb she didn't even know that she was alive!"

    But I fear, the problem here went a lot deeper, for the single reason that she was not alone - and, at least partly - not entirely responsible for being an idiot. Apart from those born with a mental deficiency which prevents them from attaining the intellectual wherewithal that is considered 'common' intelligence, and for which no aspersions are either ascribed or inferred in this critique, NO ONE has the right or, for that matter, the excuse to remain this blind-sighted, held-back, confused and isolated so that their future existence is all but confirmed as one on-going nightmare in a world where virtually everyone knows more than they do.

    This woman, presumably, did not grow up in a cave. Well-groomed and well-presented from a physical standpoint, she also possessed the mental acuity to learn - given half the chance and an ounce of opportunity.

    Again, to those would would make the idiotic inference of 'well, the Titanic was before her time. How was she to know it?' or suggest that perhaps she had not studied European history, and therefore knew not where Budapest was situated, at the very least she ought to have known Europe was NOT a country, but a continent!

    Personal story: in a former job I worked with a bunch of millennials who I thought were well-rounded individuals. I was a supervisor and had a boss one year younger than I, so - at that time, respectively he and I were 45 and 44. One day, we were discussing the tragic anniversary of Princess Diana's death when one of the millennials standing nearby asked who Princess Diana was? Flabbergasted, I corralled the remaining 4 co-workers and put the question to them. Who was Princess Diana? Of the 4, only one thought she had 'something to do' with Britain, while the others were unable to identify her place of origin or even know that she had, in fact, met with a tragic end.

    Unable to help myself I proceeded thus: "You are aware that there is a continent on the other side of the ocean?" "Yes." "And you are equally aware that one of the islands just off its mainland is called Britain?" "Yes." "And that Britain is overseen by a monarchy?" "Yes". "And that the monarchy - at present - is governed by a Queen - the Queen having a son, the son having married and produced two heirs, before divorcing their mother, the Princess Diana who thereafter met a man not of her caste but chose to become his lover and was then killed - either by accident or on purpose - in a tunnel in France while vacationing in Paris?" All of this latter bit of knowledge was - amazingly - news to everyone except my boss - a native Brit.

    So, we are in the throes of a collective cultural amnesia that is swamping the world with devastating consequences to the younger generation. It's time more of us who know better did more with the knowledge we've been given than simply assume the generations that have followed us are more up to snuff with things than we are.

    They're not.

    They're suffering from a dearth that needs our help to get them up to speed. This isn't a criticism of youth per say as much as a call to everyone who reads this, who knows someone of a 'teachable' age, to become that divining rod of knowledge and mentor.

    Trust me on this: the younger generation doesn't know half as much as you do. Sad - but true. And their myopic view of the world is killing their ability to go forth and further represent it in meaningful ways that stand on the shoulders of the past. How can they, when they possess no knowledge of it?
     
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  3. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    Sad when fifth graders are smarter than adults, though I think many kids learn quite a lot through elementary school, then start to decline as they progress through high school when being smart is seen as a bad thing.
     
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  4. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    This "deficit" has been happening for a long time.

    When I was younger, I didn't recognize pictures of David Ben-Gurion and didn't know what was Ben-Gurion's significance. (My extended family is Israeli).

    At that time, I also didn't recognize pictures of war criminals like Hermann Goering, Joseph Goebbels, Adolf Eichmann, etc ... and didn't know what their crimes were.
     
  5. TJPC

    TJPC Producer

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    It depends on the life you lead. My brother-in-law is in his mid 50s living in Toronto. He fancies himself an artist/musician/author, but he specializes in such arcane subjects that he is totally removed from the real world and his knowledge stops at about 1980.

    We needed to get ahold of him and my daughter said she would order an “Uber” for him (Toronto is Uber centre for Canada). He had no idea what she was talking about.
     
  6. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Cinematographer

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    Wait, out of the entire class, not a single person answered "Han Solo?"
     
  7. Nick*Z

    Nick*Z Screenwriter

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    With all due respect to Mr. Ben-Gurion's legacy as the architect of modern Israel, his influence would arguably be little known to many living in the United States today outside the Jewish faith. That's not to suggest his contributions to world history are unimportant. On the contrary. But when the youth of today living in America know not even their own political/historical/and pop figures from any vintage other than their own, what chance do leaders from the outside world of as significant importance have to enter even the peripheries of their subconscious? Again, sad. Very. Simply, tragic!

    PS - your comment about the aforementioned 'deficit' going on for some time does not exactly warm the heart. The escalation of modern-age amnesia is what I am sincerely more concerned about. Plenty of time to forget the past if ever one acquires Alzheimer's.
     
  8. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    (On an tangential aside).

    Since we're on a tv/movie message forum.

    David Ben-Gurion does have a semi-famous grandnephew: Les Moonves.

    Before Moonves was ousted, he was the CEO of the CBS corporation which became the king of tv crime procedurals under his tenure.

    https://www.jta.org/2011/10/06/default/all-in-the-family-les-moonves-is-grandnephew-of-ben-gurion
     
  9. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    The only reason I know anything about war criminals and other unsavory events from history, is from watching a lot of documentaries on various history cable channels. Later I read some books, such as "Banality of Evil" by Hannah Arendt.
     
  10. Joel Fontenot

    Joel Fontenot Screenwriter

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    My 10-year-old knows who Indy is, who plays him and that he's also Han Solo. He likes Indiana Jones and Star Wars.

    Of course, he also knows about Led Zeppelin, Tangerine Dream, Alan Parsons, Pink Floyd, Simple Minds and The Chromatics, as well as all the songs on those Kidz Bop CDs and who sings those songs originally.
     
  11. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Cinematographer

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    When Kidz Bop does The Dark Side of the Moon, I am so in!! :rolling-smiley::rolling-smiley:
     
  12. Keith Cobby

    Keith Cobby Cinematographer

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    As time passes there are more people and events to learn about. My 12 year old might recognise Harrison Ford but he wouldn't know Clark Gable or Bogie or probably Elvis!
     
  13. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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    Like I said, it's at least 2500 years. You guys keep having fun bitching about today's kids tho.
     
  14. Tommy R

    Tommy R Screenwriter

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    I have had a lot of shame hurled my way in life because I didn’t know this or I didn’t know that (movie/tv/music/literature/politics/etc.), and I’m tired of it. I feel like I know an acceptable amount of things on a wide range of topics, and am always trying to broaden my horizons and learn more. But learning more is a very hard thing, for example when you ask a question and you get in reply is a dirty look like they think you’re a dumbass or something. And of course they don’t even answer your question or want to explain anything to you about whatever topic it is.
     
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  15. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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  16. RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

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    What "dirty look" do you get from a simple Google search? Really, learning about ANY topic is MUCH easier than at any time in the past.
     
  17. Tommy R

    Tommy R Screenwriter

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    Well for one, google has not always existed, and even in the years it has I have only had a smart phone with the easy everyday access to an internet browser for about the last three years. But even without a smart phone I’ve always valued the internet and how much stuff I’ve come across or learned about that I probably wouldn’t of otherwise.

    Also, a lot of the negative experiences I’ve had have been in casual social situations. I’m always content with just enjoying people’s company and chiming in here and there when I have something to say, but there are a lot of toxic people who very forcibly grill you about what and why you don’t know this or that when your lack of knowledge on anything comes up. If this is not your or anybody else’s experience in life, then I’m happy for you.
     
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  18. RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

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    Sounds more like a commentary on the people in your social circle than the ease with which you can learn something. It IS easy, and it's been that way for at least 15 years.
     
  19. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    Unfortunately this is an "occupational hazard" when it comes to social groups where intelligence / knowledge of a particular niche is the "scorecard" for which the social group judges others within and outside of the group. Especially niches which attract geeky / nerdy type of folks.

    Other than walking away (or "ghosting"), there isn't much anybody can do about toxic individuals. You simply cannot change the behavior of individuals that are not happy campers, who might have other comorbidity issues (ie. persistent anger, depression, excessive alcohol use, weak egos, etc ...).
     
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  20. Tommy R

    Tommy R Screenwriter

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    The point was more that people are toxic and love to give others shit when they don’t know something. I find it much more interesting and meaningful learning things from people casually and organically, rather than keeping a written list of everything I hear in life that I am unfamiliar with and slavishly looking it all up on the internet later.

    And this isn’t just my social circle, it’s my immediate family, teachers in school, peers that aren’t “friends”, co-workers, etc. And I’m just sharing my thoughts here. I know these people exist and there’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s nice to share and hopefully people who relate can get something out of knowing we are not alone. If anyone doesn’t relate that’s great, but there’s no need to minimize my complaints.
     
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