Raging Bull

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Holadem, Nov 21, 2001.

  1. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I watched it this week, it was good, but nothing to wet my pants over?!! De Niro performance is incredible, but beside that... isnn't this movie a bit overrated? Perhaps there is something I don't get with Scorsese films: The actors (De Niro and Pesci) are excellent and the dialog is often hilarious, but they movies (Goodfellas, Casino and Raging Bull) as a whole just leave me cold emotionally.
    I often juge movies this way, while I am watching: How would I feel if the power suddenly went out? For the movies above, I wouldn't care, really. They are not painful to watch or anything, they just don't move me. I don't feel involved.
    So anyone fan of Raging Bull wants to tell me what is so great about this movie except De Niro? He is my all time favorite actor, but that is not enough. That will be [​IMG] [​IMG] for me.
    --
    Holadem
     
  2. Patrick_S

    Patrick_S Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2000
    Messages:
    3,278
    Likes Received:
    102
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    I guess it comes down to different strokes.

    I personal love this film and would easily give it four out of four stars.

    For me the story of an individual who is hell bent on destroying his life is very compelling told in this film.

    The performances turned in by the actors were excellent and the directing and editing were also superb. I also found the use of music to be perfect. I particularly like the juxtaposition use of the very melodic music with the violent boxing scenes.

    To top it all off the black and white photography was just stunning. This movie certainly would have lost some of its visual impact if it were filmed in color. A movie like this only makes me wish that more directors would take some chances and film in B&W from time to time.
     
  3. Rain

    Rain Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  4. Nick Sievers

    Nick Sievers Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2000
    Messages:
    3,481
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't really think I can add any more opinions on this as they summed it up very well. This is one of my favorite films ever, and its for those reasons above.

     
  5. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  6. Jeff_A

    Jeff_A Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    1,454
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  7. Aurel Savin

    Aurel Savin Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 1998
    Messages:
    839
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Holadem ...

    Scorsese is my favorite director, love his movies ... but ... i do agree with you somewhat on RAGING BULL.

    It never did much to me. Besides the great performances, the movie as a whole didn't quite pull me in.

    As far as GOODFELLAS and TAXI DRIVER is concerned ... that's another story.

    Just out of curiosity, what is your favorite movie? and what movies leave you "warm and fuzzy" ?
     
  8. Dharmesh C

    Dharmesh C Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2000
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    5 stars, AWESOME film. Scorcese is a genius.
    I guess its different strokes for different folks.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. David Dennison

    David Dennison Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2001
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  10. Joe D

    Joe D Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 21, 1999
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Watch it again and tell us what you think then.

    Personally it is a four out of four star movie for me.

    Some of the greatest shots of all time are in this movie.
     
  11. Gary Tooze

    Gary Tooze Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2000
    Messages:
    3,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  12. Rob Tomlin

    Rob Tomlin Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2000
    Messages:
    4,505
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am still pissed that this great film lost the Oscar for 1980 to Ordinary People! Many critics consider Raging Bull to be the best film of the 1980's. I certainly agree!

    The fact it was based on a true story, the cinematography (beautifully filmed in Black and White), the incredible performance by De Niro (the best performance EVER GIVEN imo) and Pesci, all add up to make this a truly great film.

    And to take Rain's point a step further, I thought "the message" here was that a person's biggest strengths are also usually a person's greatest weakness! Jake LaMotta proved this to be true!
     
  13. Rain

    Rain Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  14. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 1999
    Messages:
    2,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Holadem,

    You bring up the fact that Scorcese films leave you cold. I agree with that. They leave me cold as well. Scorcese does not film characters or situations so that the audience will either condone or sympathize with them. He films in an abstentious manner. He doesn't force his vision on anything. He allows himself to be removed from the film, to allow the story and the settings dictate the film. He basically captures everything with a camera and allows the viewer to accept or reject what he has shown. While I love that style of filmaking, others do not. You seem to be one that does not. Just because Scorcese, or Kubrick, or Lean seem to be worshipped on this board, that doesn't mean you are missing something. I hate when people tell you to go back and watch a film again and then see how you feel about it. As if, the first time around you had your eyes closed or were out in the kitchen while it was on. While I thought it was a terrific film, I am always happy to hear people questioning films that are touted so highly.

    Bruce
     
  15. Rain

    Rain Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That being said, I think it is always a good idea to see a film more than once before finalizing an opinion. I practice what I preach.
    I'm even planning on revisiting A.I. and Titanic, two films I hated upon first viewing, in the near future.
    While I wouldn't accuse anyone of necessarily having their eyes closed during the first viewing, some films don't give up all their nuances the first time through. Sometimes there is just too much to absorb.
     
  16. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 1999
    Messages:
    2,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't know if this is true with Scorcese films. He usually makes up-front films that don't really try to hide its meaning. But, again, you're right. There are films that require repeat viewings...I was just railing against the people who feel that if you only give a particular film one viewing, you couldn't possibly have made a correct assertation of it. Whether you watch one film a month or have watched 1000's in your life, you can decide whether you like a particular film or not after one viewing. It's not that hard to do. And 90% of the films I do watch aren't any deeper than the celluloid they're printed on. But, I dig what you're saying, Rain, and I'll get off my soapbox.
    Bruce
     
  17. John_Lee

    John_Lee Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2000
    Messages:
    966
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  18. Lin Weiwen

    Lin Weiwen Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2001
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Okay...I'm a huge fan Martin Scorsese and Raging Bull too. The framed up poster of the film in my room speaks for itself.
    So...In my personal opinion as a fan of Scorsese and De Niro....I would like to declare that.....
    Raging Bull is a truly great film!!
    Scorsese's films are never popcorn entertainment. They are unique and embody the adventurous spirit of film-making. Most of his films are provocative and have an edgy style imbued in them. He pulls no punches and this act is exemplified in the many scenes of domestic violence that occur sporadically in his films. They make the viewer feel uncomfortable as if drawn into the commotion itself and this is one of the areas where Scorsese thrives so well where other directors can't seem to pull off. Spielberg once commented that he sometimes feels like an unwanted bystander when he watches Scorsese's films.Scorsese is also a daring director and he continously tries new tricks and shots to improve his already polished cinematic art.
    OK...Apart from De Niro's superb performance, RAGING BULL is also well directed, shot and edited. Cinematic acts of genius are evident throughout the film. I shall highlight some of those sequences and why they are worth savouring and admiring.
    The opening sequence reeks of stark poetic beauty: Mascagni's Cavalleria Rusticana played with the image of De Niro shadow boxing in slow motion.
    The cut from from fat La Motta to young La Motta with the lines "That's entertainment....that's entertainment..." Whack! Punch comes flying in..
    Domestic violence(in this case, over a steak) portrayed effectively with the aid of De Niro's acting early in the film. "It's a piece of charcoal!! Bring it over here! Bring it over here!" Flips table over.....This is one scene where I believe some viewers might feel chilled and this is exactly how Scorsese draws his audience into the fray;with tight direction, no holds barred dialouge and great acting.
    The colour montage of Jake and Joey La Motta in happier times interspersed with Jake sparring opponents. Scorsese's deliberate use of grainy stock and home video style look gives the film even more realism.
    The silencing of sound during key moments in the boxing ring heightens the atmosphere and imparts a sense of what La Motta is going through to the audience.
    The tracking shot of Jake and Joey emerging from the locker room midway through the film is a predecessor of the tracking Copacabana shot in Goodfellas. Is Scorsese showing off or trying to capture the mood and feel of the environment the characters are going through? I reckon it's both.
    Scorsese pays homage to the B&W early films of American cinema by giving the brawl outside the nightclub involving Joey...a 'chaplinesque' look. The characters move in a slightly fast forward motion and look amusing which is rather ironic giving how rowdy the situation is.
    The On the Waterfront speech rehearsed by La Motta towards his reflected self leaves the viewer thinking once the film ends: Is La Motta blaming himself for the plight he has gotten into or is he blaming his younger brother for failing to look out for him? Will he ever seek redemption and exorcise his violent past? Scorsese leaves that to the audience and effectively keeps De Niro's enigmatic character intact.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  19. Rain

    Rain Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  20. bill lopez

    bill lopez Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 1999
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Many critics have called it the best movie of the 80's.

    It makes my top 10 of the 80's. What movie that came out in the 21 century is better than RAGING BULL?
     

Share This Page