Radio Shack Composite Cables Used for Component Hookup?

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Brian Mansure, Mar 18, 2004.

  1. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    I can't recall exactly where I read it but someone stated that they were using Radio Shack Gold Series Component A/V cables [ http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...5Fid=15%2D1509 ] as component inter-connects.

    I would assume that as long as all three of the bundled composite cables are sheilded and 75 ohm stable this would be okay.

    Is this a correct assumtion?

    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    You can even get the cheaper Left/Right/Video cables and use them for component hookups.


    Well... you can buy $25 tires for a high-end sports car and it would be 'ok'/work. But do you really want to?

    The inexpensive RS cables would be fine for a Standard Video system.

    Remember: component video is a 1940's standard ment for a 9" tube. And you are trying to buy cheaper cables not designed for even the 1940's standard.

    But for a 30" or smaller tube television pushing standard video - it will give satisfactory results (even if you are using a display over 3 times the standard).
     
  3. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    Thanks for the quick response Bob.

    I understand where you are coming from.
    Just trying to balance price and performance to hit an acceptable value for my dollar.

    Are there any particular brand of cables that you prefer to help me with a short list?

    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  4. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    Brian, I used the RS Gold Series A/V cables for awhile when I first upgraded to a progressive scan DVD player a few years ago -- I had a spare set, and I didn't have any component cables. They worked fine for that application until I finally bought a dedicated component video cable set.

    I never tried the cables with a HDTV signal.
     
  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I'm using Radio Shack Gold audio tape deck cables for component on a 27" NTSC TV and they work great.
     
  6. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    If the audio cables are 75ohm coaxial then go for it. I would guess the video cable (yellow) is but alot of times the audio cables (red/white) are simply 2-conductor non-coaxial.

    The comment about component video being a 1940's standard is true, but the real question of whether or not a cable will work is a matter of impedance and bandwidth. While component video was invented in the 1940's, the bandwidtch requirements of Progressive Scan and HD video far exceed those of Interlaced NTSC video. That said, any 75ohm RG59/RG6 cable has enough bandwidth for all three formats.

    So if the audio part of that cable ir 75ohm coax, it'll work just fine. I'm doing the same thing in my temp (apartment) setup until I know the lengths I'll need to run to my projector in my more permanent setup. Then I'll be building 75ohm Canare DIY Cables (I'm already using DIY Canare in the rest of my system). These cables are broadcast quality and very ecconomical when you build them yourself. May not make a noticable difference when compared to decent quality Radio Shack, AR, or Monster stuff, but it eliminates any doubt in my mind that the cables are causing any degredation in performance, and it's also cool to build it yourself!

    Hope this helps [​IMG]
     
  7. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Well... you did not tell me:

    - How large is your screen (larger -> more sensitive)
    - What type of video you are sending (Component = 4Mhz, Progressive = 13 Mhz, 720/1080 = 35 Mhz)


    I DO like the Radio Shack and AR Pro cables for basic systems (display's smaller than about 30" pushing standard video)

    But if you have a HDTV - I recommend the custom cable sites. For $50-$120 they will use coax and connectors normally sold to the brodcast and production studio industry. These cables will rival the $220 Monster cables for quality and have many happy customers here.

    Just so we are clear - all my harping on 1940's standards is to help you be aware that if the package says "Component" it only has to be compatible with 4 Mhz NTSC video. Progressive & HD are different and you should be aware of this.
     
  8. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    Thanks for the added replies fellas.
    I really appreciate your opinions and advice.

    Bob, I have just purchased my first RPTV. It's the Hitachi 51S500 widescreen HDTV.

    I have 2 pieces of gear I would like to hookup with component cables, a Sony 5 disk Progressive DVD player and a Comcast HD cable box.

    I don't consider myself a "videophile" but I do apprecaite a higher level of PQ than most of my friends and family so I can be picky. I would say that whenever purchasing my HT setup I've always tried to shoot for the "best bang for your buck" equipment if that helps anyone better advise me.

    Thanks again,
    Brian
     
  9. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    I like your choice - I've had my eye on the Hitachi as well.

    That unit ran you about $2100 so anything LESS than $210 for cables is a good target. (The custom cable sites can get you out for less.)

    My advice: at least 1 custom cable to hook directly between the HD Cable box and the television. You want the good, HD rated coax for this as this will carry your highest frequencies.

    You CAN get away with Radio Shack or AR-Pro2 cables for the DVD player to televison connection. This should run you about $40. But if you can - get another custom cable for this.

    Dont run the video through your reciever unless:

    - Your reciever says it is HD rated for video (or has a video bandwidth about 90 Mhz)

    - You dont mind buying 3 component cables (2 from the box's to the reciever, 1 from the reciever to the TV).
     
  10. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    Thanks, it's a nice set. We ended up with a pretty decent deal through Sears, for a little over $1900 including delivery and tax with 100% free financing till March 2005. It's my first RPTV so I'm still getting use to some of the
    differences from my 32" Sony Wega.

    We actually didn't have the HD cable box until Friday so I was kinda surprized when the Comcast installer had the new HD cable box hooked up to the Hitachi via cmponent cables that looked like Monster brand knock-offs. Other than not saying "Monster" on the labels I could swear they are the Monster Series "1" component cables.
    For now I will continue to use those and I'll purchase a 12' AR component cables from my local best buy for the DVD player. As our budget permits I will order some HD rated custom component cables.

    Thanks again for your opinions and help.

    Brian
     

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