Radiator Heater Newbie Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chuck C, Nov 11, 2002.

  1. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    We have steam radiator heaters throughout our house here in college. The second story heats up real bad while the downstairs is normal. Some radiator heaters don't even warm the room well while others get way too hot. all the radiators are controlled by one thermostat. They all have handles that turn clockwise/counterclock wise. Should we just call the heater company to help find a radiator heater equilibrium?
     
  2. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    Are you sure they're steam and not hot water radiators? With hot water radiators, you need to periodically (once or twice a year) bleed the air out of each one. If this is the case, each radiator has a little valve near the top that looks like a miniature garden spigot without a handle. The top just looks like a square nut. While the heat is on, you hold a cup under the valve and turn the nut. For a few seconds, air will come out. Once the water starts flowing out, you can turn off the valve and you're done.
     
  3. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    In that case, we have hot water radiators...the heater company came out in October to refill them.
     
  4. DaveMcS

    DaveMcS Second Unit

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    what floor is the thermostat on?

    Im guessing the tstat is on the floor that gets WAY too hot.
    thereby shutting down the heat before the other areas get a chance to warm up. Sounds like you need some sort of balancing work done. I dont know if its possible, but the radiators near the t-stat should prolly be shut off so as to prevent that room from heating up too quick. this would allow the outlying rooms to heat up longer before the system pops off.

    just my 2 cents


    I troll around on a board called hvac talk..google search for it and ask the pros there for help...
     
  5. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    You can get a "radiator key" at Home Depot. It is a tiny thing that fits the little valve on the radiator and makes it easier to bleed or burp or fart your radiators. Air collects in old water radiators and impedes the flow of water around the system. Bleed the air out, and hot water goes where it needs to go!

    Turn your heat up to 85, give it a little while, then, starting downstairs and using a cup and an old towel to protect your hand from hot water, loosen the valve on a radiator... I usually use a pair of pliers to hold the little key so I don't get burned. Air will hiss out, followed by a spit or drip of water. When water comes out, close the valve up tight and move on to the next radiator.

    By the time you get upstairs, your house will be all toasty hot. After you have farted all the radiators, turn the heat down again!

    Hot water radiators ROCK!

    Plus, they dry out the air so you wake up in the morning with a box of Triskets in your nose. But maybe that was too much information.

    MC
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    the T stat is probably downstairs, the cold air is falling down and the stat is leaving the heat on until the downstairs hits it's setting, regardless of the temp upstairs.

    I'd put my money on them being steam, being on a university campus (at least that's what it sounds like? maybe I'm wrong) they probably have a central steam plant that serves the whole campus, that's how it's been done at both universities I attended anywho
     
  7. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    Our thermostat is downstairs (in our four bedroom house). It's behind my buddy's loft and near his computer. Do you guys think that turning the key to let air out is safe? Will it do the trick?
     
  8. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    The air in the system is a bad thing. It blocks the flow of the water -- if this is a water system and not a steam system as we seem to have some confusion about. I'd think it's a water system, as steam would not need a key, I think.

    Let the air out of the system and the water will flow unimpeded and you will get much better heat! That's what the key's for.

    Give it a try. I dare you.

    MC
     
  9. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    Like Micah said, letting the air out is safe. It's not under high pressure or anything like that. When the last of the air is coming out, you'll get a mix of air and water so it will sputter a bit, but nothing that your average plastic beer cup (you have some of those, don't you??) won't catch.
     

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