Quick Question on the Difference Between Cables

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DougKuhn, Jan 14, 2003.

  1. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Hope this is not a repetitive question. But I am going to be ordering my speaker wires and related cables for my new Denon AVR-1803 setup tonight and I am going to order some component RCA cables for my DBS reciever to plug into the Denon. I am going to go with Monster Cables and I was wondering what the difference between their Video 2 and Video 3 was? And is it worth going to to Video 3?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Since Monster does not post specifications for their cables, it is really difficult to say what difference there is.
    My guess is that the Video 2 handle component video just fine (up to 4 Mhz) and the Video 3 is designed for HD video (up to 35 Mhz).
    But ... if you are ordering cables, why not order from a custom cable house? You will be getting professional-grade Canare or Belden coax for ... about the price of Monster 2 or even less.
    These cables tend to be the best bang-for-the-buck. The cables produced by www.bettercables.com are actually considered 'exotic' because they have a silver-coating on the center conductor, but cost about the same as Monster 2.
    This thread on Home Theater Accessories has some other sites for parts and cables. Good Luck.
     
  3. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Bob,
    Thanks for the reply. I think I will have a look over at bettercables and see what they have since I have not ordered anything yet. Who knew cables were this hard to shop for (I certainly didn't). [​IMG]
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    There is a lot of traditional profit from cables that is pumped up by "Marketing" and some junk-science to goad you into spending $$$ for coax that costs $1.50/ft in bulk.
    Chris White has a great web site that shows you how to build your own cables. But it takes some time and an investment in the special tools.
    Read Chris White's web page, then check out some of the custom sites and you will start to see that many of them follow the same technique and use the same materials as Chris's web site. And if you have a HDTV system, check out the BetterCables site. They have a rather exotic silver-coated component cable set that starts about $90, but people with 100" projectors swear by them.
    PS: Why dont you tell us what you are hooking up. You say you want to use Component cables from the DBS receiver to the Dennon. But this means you must also run component cables from the Dennon to the TV.
    And it's not really worth running through the Dennon unless you have 2 or more Component video sources.
     
  5. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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    Any video cable, with the correct terminations (RCA plugs) will work equally well. Some reputable brands: Trisonic, Belken, Magnavox.

    Personally, I use Recoton and am very happy with it.

    For a component connection, you need three video cables with RCA plugs. You can spend anywhere from $10 on up.

    If spending an extra $50, $100, $1000 (pretty much the sky's the limit with premium-priced interconnects) makes you feel your picture is that much better, go for it.

    Better Cables advertises here so you will support the Forum by getting your cable from them.
     
  6. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    I should have posted my set up...What I have is the Denon, a Hughes DirecTV receiver (with s-video and RCA outputs), a Sony DVD player (not sure of the model off the top of my head but it is up to snuff), an older VCR that works best off coax, and a PS2. The TV is an older 27" Maganvox with RCA inputs. No S-Video or optical inputs.

    My plan is to have everything running into the Denon..although the VCR will not be included in this and probably taken out of the equation since it is rarely used. Once everything is running to the Denon, I will have one RCA video cable running to the TV.

    I guess I still have some reading to do before making any final decisions.
     
  7. Wayne Clark

    Wayne Clark Agent

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    Doug, I don't mean to ask a smartassed question, but why are you buy component cables. It sounds like for what you are describing, you would be buying composite cables. To be honest, and I don't want this to sound condescending, If I were hooking up the components you are, I would be using Radio Shack standard cables, Maybe Gold if I were feeling rich. If you are spending the money now and planning on using these cables for a much grander setup in the future, then I would agree with the splurge on big time cables. As with all things, you have to do what is going to make you happy. Good Luck, Wayne.
     
  8. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Wayne,
    No problem. [​IMG] I think my main issue is the TV. I do not plan on upgrading that for quite some time...unless it explodes on me sooner than expected. So I figured I would buy some good, well more expensive, cables for all the units running to the receiver. Which I felt was a reasonable approach to my setup. Again, the TV does not have S-Video or optical inputs, only RCA type inputs.
    Maybe I was getting my terms crossed...I plan on buying composite video cables for the DVD going into the receiver and a composite going out to the TV from the receiver. And using an optical cable running from the DVD to the Receiver and an optical (for kicks) from the PS2 into the receiver. As for the DBS receiver...I plan on using a set of component RCA cables, which are my only option on the particular DBS receiver I have other than s-video and its standard coax input/output.
    Maybe I am confused? [​IMG] (Cars are so much easier to play with [​IMG] )
    Doug
     
  9. Dave Goff

    Dave Goff Agent

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    AR cables for RCA composite set up are pretty good and half the price of Monster.
     
  10. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  11. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Huh...Am I a rookie or what? [​IMG] OK...lemme get this straight (I apologize for my ignorance).
    (Note: I am not factoring in S-Video at all in my equation here...so that can be immediately considered null.)
    Maybe I have been wording my posts incorrectly and am confusing myself...I understand the difference between the three types of cables. The two I am looking into are (quoted from above by Bob):
    1) Composite: Single RCA cable, usually with yellow markings. (yellow...Video out to video in)
    2) Component: Three identical length Composite cables with RCA plugs usually bundled together with different colored bands on the connectors (red, white, yellow...A/V out to A/V in).
    Is it being said that running the component cables to the receiver from the DSS unit....a component cable must be run from the receiver back out to the television in order for me to view the TV? And a sole composite cable running from my Denon receiver to the TV will not work? I would think it would work since there is no video switching required. [​IMG]
    Slowly learning.......
     
  12. MarcVH

    MarcVH Second Unit

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    My Best Buy does not carry AR Pro, and they're not pictured on BestBuy.com either. They do have AR's Performance line, the dark blue ones, which are the next tier down. Might that be what you mean?

    I have seen AR Pro at Sears, although they had a lousy selection at high prices last I looked.
     
  13. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  14. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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    You're making progress Doug. Your point #1 is totally correct.

    Point #2 is mostly correct. A component cable set is simply three composite cables, each terminating in an RCA plug at each end. However, these are usually color-coded red-green-blue, as are the component jacks to which they connect at the TV and DVD player (and the component I/O's on your receiver if you do the video switching through your receiver, which may cause signal degradation if the receiver's switching circuitry can't handle the progressive-scan, 480p bandwidth of 31.5 Mhz or the HDTV 1080i bandwidth of 33.0 Mhz).

    A set of "A/V" cables or "A/V" jacks refer to cables or jacks for the composite-video/right analog audio/left analog audio connection. An A/V cable is also a three-cable set of RCA-plug terminated cables, with the yellow-coded cable taking the composite video, the red taking right audio, and the white (sometimes black) taking left audio.

    Actually, you can use an A/V cable for a component-video connection. Just make sure to match the same-colored plug to the same0labeled jack at each end of the circuit.

    As for brand, I'd suggest Recoton or something similarly priced. If you find any lack of video quality with Recoton cables (you won't), you can always move up to something more expensive.

    Even the A/V mags have come out and admitted, at the risk of ticking off some pretty big advertisers, that the only thing premium about premium cables is the price.

    If you do decide to go with one of the more upscale brands, keep in mind that buying from Better Cables supports the Forum (link above). Also, I believe they fabricate custom-length cables and, though the standard pre-made cable lengths of six or 12 feet aren't long enough to cause significant attenuation to a line-level signal, such as a composite or component video signal, it's always best, as a general rule, to keep cable length, and thus resistance, as low as possible. Having a cable cut just as long as you need it lets you accomplish that.
     
  15. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Got it. Took me a few days to get that sunk in. I understand now. [​IMG] Thanks guys!
    So simple...yet so difficult.
     
  16. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Erm, I don't think that's the case. Aren't video cables 75 ohm, with higher bandwidth, and a tad different than audio cables? I am suspicious of cheaper A/V connections, that they are all the same cable, but theoretically aren't the video/audio cables different?
     
  17. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  18. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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