Questions regarding upgrading to Windows XP

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon_Are, Jun 15, 2002.

  1. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    I'm going to be upgrading my Windows98 to XP within the next few days. I'm wondering how painless/painful this will be, specifically with regard to the data files I've created under 98.

    Is this a fairly smooth process? I'll have all my important data backed up as a precaution, but will the upgrade retain my Word files, etc. without me having to re-install them?

    How about things within Outlook Express, such as emails sent & received, the address book, etc.

    Thanks,

    Jon
     
  2. Kami

    Kami Screenwriter

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    It should retain everything if you do an upgrade and not a fresh install.
    Get ready for stability and no more headaches or crashing [​IMG]
    WinXP = Win2k with eye candy and more features. It's really stable.
     
  3. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    Windows XP is really stable compared to WinMe (the most unstable OS I've ever experienced), Win98 or Win95. But Windows 2000 is still the most stable MS OS, in my opinion and experience, and the opinion and experience of quite a lot of other people as well. But it's a slight difference, one not to get too hung up about. The stability of XP is not quite that of 2000, but it's certainly nothing to really worry about.
    As Kami said, if you upgrade your existing Windows, all your settings, favorites, history, temporary internet files, email messages and address book, accounts, data files, etc., should remain intact and be taken over by the new OS.
    However, if you upgrade your existing Windows, there are sometimes various problems with the older OS that get imported into the new OS as well. Things like registry errors (superfluous keys, incorrect values, etc.), orphaned files (DLLs, INFs, and other files that are no longer needed but never got deleted), and various other little things. This is why many people, whenever installing a new OS, prefer to do a clean installation. This gets rid of all the old baggage the old OS is still carrying around and gives you a fresh start.
    You can do a clean install and still keep all your data files, favorites, email messages and accounts, and all the other stuff. These are all files in various locations that can be backed up and imported into the new OS. Because of the added complexity of doing a clean install, however, I'm not going to give you detailed instructions on where to find all that stuff and how to do it all, unless you tell me you really want me to. I'll be happy to help you, don't misunderstand me, I'm just not going to do it until I know that it's needed. [​IMG]
     
  4. Peter-PP

    Peter-PP Stunt Coordinator

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    Do a clean full install from scratch. That will save you all the headaches and stress. Your PC will also be very happy.
     
  5. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    I would also go the route of clean-install. That said, the upgrade process with XP is supposed to be better than in previous version of Windows.
     
  6. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Is a clean install possible when my software is just the upgrade version??

    And won't a clean install delete all my data?

    Thanks to all,

    Jon
     
  7. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  8. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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  9. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    By "clean install", yes, I mean reformatting the hard drive. It's possible to do it without reformatting, but it's even more complicated that way (you have to get a bootable floppy disc, boot from it, then delete the old Windows folder and some other files from the drive).

    Reformatting is the easiest way. Yes, reformatting will delete everything. This is why you make backups first. Yes, you can do a clean install with an upgrade copy; as Rob Gillespie mentioned, you will need a CD-ROM from an earlier version of Windows to prove that you are eligible to use the upgrade version. Other than the eligibility check, there is no difference between the full and upgrade versions.

    The critical part of doing a clean install is, obviously, backing up all your data, anything you want to keep, before reformatting the hard drive. If you saved everything to the My Documents folder, then backup that folder; by default, it's C:My Documents. If you saved data to any other location, make sure you get that, too (and now you will realize why it was a good idea to save everything to My Documents like Windows wants you to!).

    For email...it's been a long time since I've used Win98, and I'm sorry but I forget the exact path. Maybe someone else can give it. You should also be able to find it from Outlook Express...assuming that's what you were using...by opening the Tools menu, click Options, click the Maintenance tab, and click the Store Folder button. That will tell you the path to where the store folder is. Make a backup copy of that folder. (Those directions were based on me using Outlook Express 6 on WinXP; if the exact instructions are different for your versions, again, I apologize).

    For your address book...again, assuming it's Outlook Express...you're looking for a file with the .WAB extension; I believe it would by .WAB, and it should be somewhere near where the email folder itself was (like in a different subpath of the same parent folder). Again, sorry I can't remember the exact details for Win98, but it's been so long since I've used it, and the exact locations have changed since then in newer versions of Windows. If anyone else can provide a more accurate description of where all this stuff will be located in a Win98 system, please do so.

    You should also get your email account settings. This is something you will probably want to write down. In Outlook Express, open the Tools menu and click Accounts. On the Mail tab will be a list of all email accounts you have setup. You may have one, or more than one, but for each one, open the Properties display, and copy down all the info on the General and Servers tabs. If you get any Usenet newsfeeds, those accounts will be on the News tab of the Accounts display, and you'll want to copy down the relevant settings for those, too.

    You may want to keep your Favorites. They should be in C:WindowsFavorites. If you want to keep any fonts, they're in C:WindowsFonts.

    You should also go through the Program Files folder, and look through each folder, one-by-one, to see if there's anything there you need to keep. For example, ICQ and DVD Profiler both store data in their respective Program Files folders. You may have other programs that also do that. Also, games keep their save data (saved games) in their own folders, so if you have any saved games you really want to save, make sure to backup the appropriate files for those, too.

    The Program Files, Windows, and My Documents folders are the ones that you want to go through carefully, but it's also a good idea to look through all the folders, to see if there's anything there that you'll need.

    Once you are sure that you've got a backup of everything you want to keep, you are ready to reformat your hard drive. The following assumes that you have a CD-ROM drive that can boot the computer, and is set to try to boot the computer before the hard drive (ask if you need more specific instructions on any of that).

    Put the WinXP CD-ROM in the drive and restart the computer. The CD will start to boot the computer, loading various files into memory to get things started. When it starts prompting you to tell it what to do, read everything carefully, because Microsoft uses a rather odd scheme of which key does which function. Go through the prompts, telling it to use the primary partition on the first hard drive, then telling it to format that partition...my choice would be to format with the NTFS file system, although FAT32 would also be appropriate. I forget the exact sequence of how it happens, but it's fairly easy to just go along with it, again, making sure you carefully read the instructions so that you hit the right key.

    I believe it is after setting up the hard drive that WinXP Setup asks you to prove your eligibility for the upgrade (although I could be mistaken, it may be just before it). Just follow the instructions.

    Just proceed through the Setup, responding to any questions it may ask. WinXP setup really doesn't ask you for much, unlike some earlier versions of Windows. It's fairly straightforward.

    Now the somewhat trickier part is restoring all the stuff you backed up. At some point during the installation of WinXP, it should have asked you for your name. The name you put in there is going to be part of the path to where some of this stuff needs to go. Look in C:Documents and Settings. There should be some subfolders in there called All Users, Default User, and another with your name (the name you gave when setup asked you). (There are other folders in Documents and Settings, but don't worry about those.) If you go into the folder with your name, you will see a bunch of subfolders; one of these will be called My Documents. This is where you restore your old My Documents. There is another subfolder called Favorits; obviously, this is where your old Favorites go.

    If you saved any old fonts, create a new folder named fonts (C:fonts), copy the files to that folder, then open the Control Panel, open the Fonts utility, open the File menu and click Install New Font..., then navigate to C:fonts, select all, make sure the checkbox to copy fonts to Fonts folder is checked, and add them (click OK). If you are told than a particular font is already installed, just click OK. Then delete the C:fonts folder (all the files will have been copied to C:WindowsFonts as they were installed).

    To get your old email messages back, make a new folder called email (C:email), copy the backup files there, and open Outlook Express. You'll have to set up your email account first; use the info you wrote down from earlier. Then you can open the File menu, go to Import -> Messages..., select Outlook Express from the list, then on the next screen choose the option to import mail from an OE6 store directory. Then on the screen after that, you'll need to tell it to look in C:email. Then, I believe it asks you which folders you want imported; if it does, select all, then OK. That should be it, I believe. Check in OE6 to make sure all your messages have indeed been imported, then delete the C:email folder.

    For the address book, basically repeat the steps for the messages, but from the Import submenu, you select Address Book. The rest should be self-explanatory.

    If you saved any data from any folders in the Program Files folder, first install the relevant programs, then copy the data to the appropriate location.

    ...I think that is everything you should need. I would appreciate it if someone else would review my instructions and make sure I've explained everything that is involved and haven't left anything out. Jon_Are, please wait until someone else confirms my instructions before proceding, and ask any questions you have first, before starting.
     
  10. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Cripes, Justin...how much do I owe you?[​IMG]
    I haven't yet received XP, so I won't be doing the upgrade until sometime later in the week. If anyone else has input, I'm all ears.
    Thanks a ton,
    Jon
     

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