Questions Re: 65HDX82: What is SVM - Chroma Bug?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Kass, Sep 13, 2002.

  1. Jason Kass

    Jason Kass Agent

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    Hi,
    I just got notification that my 65HDX82 will be shipped today from 6ave[​IMG] (I'm wetting myself!!!) I have a couple of questions.
    1) Why does the convergence change so much during the first 100 hours? And why 100 hours?
    2) Why is SVM bad? What is SVM?
    3)What is chroma bug problem and how do I know if I have it?
    Thanks, I will ask more as the questions come to me, especially once the TV arives.
    Jason
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Jason,

    In order to draw more attention to your thread, I have changed the title.

    -vince
     
  3. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Greg
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    On average, brand new electronics change slightly but noticeably during the first several hours of operation. Experts suggest a break in period of 100 hours to nearly guarantee that the settling is finished before you spend lots of time doing calibration such as hiring an ISF technician.
    Also some "settling" occurs each time the equipment is turned on, experts here recommend a half an hour warmup before doing calibration. This means that every time you turn it on, it will take several minutes, hopefully not more than 30 minutes, to settle into the calibrated condition.
    Very gradual drifting occurs over the years as well, thus the desire for recalibration every year or two.
    Chroma bug in a nutshell: Normally on DVD and HDTV, every two scan lines share the same coloration. DVD video is always decoded first as interlaced. Film source is formatted differently from live video but many DVD players only use the live video decoding strategy. What happens is that, during the conversion to progressive scan, the color that goes with scan lines 1 and 2 gets applied to scan lines 1 and 3 and the color that goes with lines 3 and 4 gets applied to lines 2 and 4. In places where contrasting colors meet, edges then seem more jagged and discolored streaks may be seen.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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