Questions on 16x9 TVs (Newbie)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Patrick Larkin, Apr 15, 2002.

  1. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    Hi --

    First, I have some general questions about living with a 16x9 TV.

    When viewing normal TV, I assume the set puts bars on the sides. Is this correct? Is this bad for rear projection sets?

    When viewing an anamorphically enhanced DVD, does the DVD player and set play nice and automatically switch to the correct settings?

    What happens when you put in a non-anamorphic DVD? Does the TV want to put bars on the side and display the letterboxing as well? how does it handle that? How would it handle, say, The Sopranos on normal broadcast cable where its presented letterboxed?

    Finally, a specific hardware question. The largest widescreen tube set I can find is the RCA which is 38". I gather they won't ever get much bigger than that. Is that a safe assumption? Also, since the price on these widescreen tube based sets are so high, do you forsee a price drop as being imminent? What makes them so expensive?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    The 38-inch RCA, by the way, has been discontinued. Meanwhile, the same curved, 16:9 tube can be found in the much-better-engineered Loewe Aconda, which is reviewed in the current issue of Sound & Vision. The price, though, bites.
     
  4. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    Jack --

    I see the RCA for around $2500. The Loewe is more??? did RCA replace it or did they get out of that segment of the market?

    Does anyone else make a tube TV that big?
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Patrick: I've been meaning to tell you this for a few days now--I love that sig of yours! Sir Redmond Barry at his arrogant worst! (It's one of my all-time favorite films, btw.)

    As to your questions:

    1) You can still find copies of the RCA set at various stores, for sure. But the Loewe, at nearly $6,000, is a much, much, much better-engineered display--made from high-quality parts and so beautifully and sleekly designed it just might win some art-direction awards. Only the tube itself is the same as in the RCA; everything else--power supply, electronics, etc.--is of Loewe origin. And therefore better. You owe it to yourself to check Loewe's sets out.

    2) No word yet from Thomson Multimedia if the 38-inch, 16:9 RCA is being replaced.

    3) The Sony KV-40XBR700 is currently the largest direct-view set available at 40 inches in a 4:3 aspect ratio. With its 16:9 mode on, the window then measures at 36 inches.
     
  6. NathanS

    NathanS Agent

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    Anyone have a link to news about the 38" getting discontinued?

    The 38" is so expensive, because of all of the glass in the tube, and also the strict tolerances needed in such a large tube. The chassis is also expensive, and complex.
     

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