Questions About R-Rated Movies

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrew_Sch, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. Andrew_Sch

    Andrew_Sch Cinematographer

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    Being as I turn 17 today, I can now get into R-rated movies alone. A few questions:

    1. What kind of ID do I need? Does it have to be something official or will they let me in with a school ID that has a photo and birthdate?

    2. Can I get friends in my age group in without having to make up something like, "Our parents were killed in a freak accident in the zoo's monkey house years ago and I've raised them ever since?"
     
  2. Darren Davis

    Darren Davis Stunt Coordinator

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    The whole R-rated movies requiring an ID is kind of odd to me. I went to plenty while being under the age of 17; in fact, the only ones I had problems with were the South Park movie and American Pie 2 (those were both solved by my best friend's older brother, about 20, who bought us the tickets). But, here's to answer your questions:
    1. Your best bet is to use a driver's license or Learner's permit as it's official and recognized state-wide. The only time I've ever used school photo ID is to get a discount (oh yes, this is sweet[​IMG] ) but my school only issues one Freshmen year so depending on what info your school puts on there it might not work. If they ask, always have your Learner's or License.
    2. Just play it cool and DON'T have your friends around or in sight (especially if they look young). Walk up there and buy your tickets and then walk back, out of sight, and give your friends their tickets. In American Pie 2 there were ushers walking around checking but the only thing they looked at was the ticket. They don't have time to check ID so once they see you holding a ticket they just assume your parents bought it for you.
    This was all compiled from my personal experiences. Hope it helps!
     
  3. Jason Whyte

    Jason Whyte Screenwriter

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  4. JonBoriss

    JonBoriss Stunt Coordinator

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    for me its been different for different theaters, i have 3 near me. one is very strict and if you look under 30 they card and you can only buy 1 ticket per id. another i just need to show it once for as many tickets, and another they dont care, so it depends on the place. Usually big chain theaters are pretty strict on carding. If you have a drivers liscense that is your best bet.
     
  5. Matt Pelham

    Matt Pelham Screenwriter

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    Depends on the theater. Some will make you show IDs for every ticket you purchase, some will sell you as many as you want with no questions asked.
     
  6. Greg*go

    Greg*go Supporting Actor

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    I could be wrong, but I believe you have to be 21 to do the legal adult route with your friends. The biggest thing is to act cool. If you act like you belong, then they won't question it. But you can't act like your acting... But hey, you're 17 so screw your friends [​IMG] You can always tell them how good the movie was.
    The only time ever I was carded after turning 17 was for the Southpark movie. And that's only because the local news was talking about how the movie was rated R, yet theaters were letting kids in to see it. Which made me wonder if some anchor person watched the damn movie and thought "wow, what a good idea for a story!"
     
  7. James Bergeron

    James Bergeron Supporting Actor

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    Wow, I use to just go act cool and ask worked for me.

    OR..... like 100% of the theatres here are stupid, there is an usher or whatever checking your ticket before you enter "the theatre hall" basically it's a long hallway to which you get to each theatre. So you can go get a ticket for some G movie show it, then walk on into the R movie.

    Haven't people been doing this for years??

    Maybe it is less strict in canada.
     
  8. Michael Pakula

    Michael Pakula Second Unit

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    James this used to be the case but lately when a popular R-Rated movie is released now a days like Jackass and has some kind of teen appeal than they will actualy have an usher infront of that paticular film's door. So you have to have some id to buy tickets than once again show your ticket and ID at the door of the cinema. It was weird because one theater I went to once even had a cop with the usher beside him checking the ID's. I usually just bring
    my passport since I dont have a Drivers Lisence yet. It's
    good I turned 18 this year because most of the R-Rated at theaters in Toronto are stricter now. I still remember the old days though of when it was easy to sneak in.

    -Mike
     
  9. Matt Stone

    Matt Stone Lead Actor

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    I never had problems getting into R rated flicks before I was 17. In fact, the first time I ever got asked for an ID was at Varsity Blues, and I happened to have just turned 17 anyway. I'm 21 and still don't have my driver's license (ain't that screwy), so I just use a state issued ID. It's like 3 bucks or something and looks like a Driver's License.
     
  10. JonZ

    JonZ Lead Actor

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    Growing up in my teens(during the 80's),we were always let in for R Rated movies.

    A drivers license should do.
     
  11. Sean Cauley

    Sean Cauley Stunt Coordinator

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    I turned 17 ten years ago, and things weren't terribly strict back then (although I didn't go to the movies that often until I was 16 or 17 and could drive myself). The only bad time I ever had was when, attempting to see Terminator 2, I was sold a ticket and then was turned away by the ticket-tearer and told to just go get a refund. He was kind of rude about it, but just doing his job.

    When I was in college, the two local theaters (both Carmike Cinemas franchises) had an 18-and-up policy for R-rated movies (it was a very conservative town). Once, the manager came into the auditorium before Natural Born Killers and implored a mother to send her two young kids to another movie (which, admittedly, was the smart move; they would be way too young to "get" the movie--but still, it's her decision, not the manager's).

    Judging by the general ages of the crowds I see these days, I don't think it's too strict. The only real tough time for teenagers I recall was the summer of '99, when South Park and Blair Witch and the like were in theaters. This was in the months following the Columbine High School shootings and the nationwide uproar over whether Hollywood was responsible for corrupting young minds. During those months, there were theater staff members at the door of each auditorium screening R-rated features, triple-checking tickets and ID. By the fall season, it was laid-back once again.
     
  12. Matthew Chmiel

    Matthew Chmiel Cinematographer

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    1. Best bet is driver's license or a learner's permit. A state-issued photo ID doesn't hurt either.
    2. Darren said it best. Do not have your friends anywhere in sight and play it cool. If you can't get tickets, tell your friends just to buy tickets to a PG-13 film and sneak in cause most theater ushers really don't give a shit. I should know as I've snuck into R-rated movies a lot. [​IMG]
     
  13. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    I saw "Supervixons" when I was 16 and didn't have a problem. Generally just about anything works unless you look 10. Movies are much easier than Beer (It was 18 when I was growing up)
     
  14. Declan

    Declan Second Unit

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    well over here in the UK movies (after the pg rating) are 12, 15 and 18. So if your under the age of the movie you wanna see..........wait for the home release. Did'nt stop many of us trying though[​IMG]
     
  15. Will_B

    Will_B Producer

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    About the "Adult Guardian" bit, one manager at a theater I know inteprets that as "court appointed guardian," like a guardian for a mentally handicapped orphan or something.

    Course we're talking about a freak who once almost got the theater sued when he harassed a caucasian adult parent in her forties whose teenage child was asian (adopted), since he didn't believe they were related.

    Perhaps in this economic climate theaters will be more interested in selling tickets.
     
  16. Declan

    Declan Second Unit

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  17. Scott Leopold

    Scott Leopold Supporting Actor

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    The only problems I ever had with carding were for Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, and They Live. I was 13 or 14 when me and a friend went to see MMBT, which was PG-13. We each had ID's of some sort, but they wouldn't let us in because they insisted it was rated R. This was a little, small town theater, and we later found out that they didn't yet have any PG-13 inserts for the poster holders (the holders had a thing beneath them that held the inserts that told the rating of the movies), so they just used the R insert for all PG-13 movies. My friend was willing to let it drop, but I almost got the cops called on us when I called out the manager, showed him the rating on the poster, then called him a couple choice names when he still refused to let us in.

    For They Live, the first theater we tried to see it at turned us away. There were four of us: myself and my cousin, both of whom were 16, and my broter and his friend, both of whom were 18. They said they'd allow my brother to buy my ticket, but refused to let him or his friend buy for our cousin since they didn't consider either to be "legal guardians" for him. The next theater we went to let us in without carding us.

    Other than that, though, I never had any problems getting into R-rated films, although I never really started trying on my own until I was 15 or so.
     

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