Questions about dual-deck CD recorders

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jesse Skeen, Jan 5, 2003.

  1. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    Since I still don't have any sort of CD recording device yet, I've been looking at what's out there. I was going to get something for my computer, but I'm sort of computer illiterate and that just seems like too much trouble so I'm leaning more towards a plug-in-and-use kind of thing. What I'd mainly be using it for is recording weird stuff I have on record and 8-track, and sharing out of print stuff that I have on CD (not any 'unauthorized duplication of copyrighted material', which of course is bad [​IMG] ). I can get a good discount on a Sony RCDW1, which has both a recording deck and playback-only in one unit and accepts both CD-R and CD-RW, but I still don't know enough about these things. My main questions are:
    Can you use any type of blank CD with these, or does it have to be a special "music" CDR and not a "data" one?
    After making a recording, can you go back and add track marks or do you have to do that in real-time while it's recording? I don't care at all about cleaning up the sound on old records, which supposedly is the main advantage of using a computer instead of a standalone deck, but I do want to put track marks on everything.
    Is there any sort of 'copy management' system that keeps you from making copies of things you've recorded yourself? For example if I made a CD-R of a record and wanted to copy it for friends, would it let me make copies of that or not? (I'm not intending to copy commercial CDs and make copies off of those, and supposedly these machines won't let you do that.)
    Can these also copy DTS CDs and/or video CDs, like you can on a computer with 2 CD-ROM drives? (I have a few DTS-encoded CDs of old quadraphonic albums made on someone's computer, taken directly from quadraphonic LPs and tapes.)
     
  2. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Jesse, consumer component CD recorders like the Sony 'W1 require you to use music CD-Rs and CD-RWs. Professional component CD recorders like those made by Tascam and HHB and some made by Sony and Marantz allow you use the cheaper computer CD-Rs and CD-RWs.

    Regarding track marks, if you are recording from CDs, the tracks marks are added automatically. From analog sources, I believe you may be able to add the tracks marks after recording everything, but before the disc is finalized. I am not sure, though, as I have never recorded from an analog source.
     
  3. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    I was looking at these types of questions a few months ago, so am interested in the thread. (Did you notice another related one on todays posts : "CD Recorders : Can you help me choose one?")

    One of the issues you don't mention is the problem of compilations made of items from sources that differ radically in volume.

    Do these standalone CD recorders permit controlling of input level volumes, so as to equalize volume levels among the tracks on the resulting compilation?

    If you are inputting from an LP, do you need a pre-amp between the turntable and the cd recorder?

    Good luck, you must have some pretty funky stuff coming from 8 track!
     
  4. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    John, this subject came up in the other thread you mentioned. I mentioned it with respect to digital record level control, and Kevin Brown mentioned analog peak search. The Harman/Kardon CDR 30 dual-tray unit that I own has a digital record level control function. This is analogous to analog level controls on a cassette deck. With the CDR 30, one can control the recording levels in the digital domain. So, if you are making a compilation from various CDs, you can adjust the recording levels in the digital domain. Truthfully, I don't use the CDR 30 for making compilations, so I haven't tried the feature much, but it is easy to use. I use a computer burner for making compilations from CDs.
    The current H/K dual-tray deck is the CDR 26. I don't believe it has digital record level adjustment, but I may be wrong. See www.crutchfield.com for more information.
    Kevin Brown mentioned that his HHB professional CD recorder has analog peak search. See the other thread running here for more information. I believe the HHB recorder is a single-tray unit.
     
  5. Marvin

    Marvin Screenwriter

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    I have an Onkyo CD recorder. As mentioned, you have to use music CD-R's rather than data CD-R's. These have come down in price though, and every so often Best Buy has a good deal on them.

    The copy management system prevents you from making 2 straight digital copies. So you can make an analog copy of an LP to CD-R and then make a digital copy of that CD-R. But you can't make a digital copy of the second CD-R (i.e. the one created via digital copy of the first one).

    In my recorder, for analog recording, you must add track marks DURING the recording, not after (minidisc is MUCH more flexible for things like this). You can add titles to the songs afterwards, before finalizing, but not track marks. I don't know if this is true for all other brands/models of CD recorders.

    However, you can first record an LP to a CD/RW disc. This gives you another shot at marking tracks, or any other corrections, if you make a mistake the first time. Then, when you get the CD/RW right you can make a digital copy to a CD-R. Of course, you can't subsequently make a digital copy of that CD-R.

    My recorder allows you to adjust the recording levels (downward only - that may not apply to other brands). Yes, you still need a pre-amp and amp in between the turntable and recorder. I don't know about copying (or playing) DTS CDs or VCDs.
     
  6. Seth V

    Seth V Stunt Coordinator

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    Jesse,

    If the recorder is able to make bit perfect copies from the original, then you can definitely make copies of DTS encoded cd's.
     

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