Questions about basement Theater

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Ramon O. Valera, Oct 23, 2003.

  1. Ramon O. Valera

    Ramon O. Valera Stunt Coordinator

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    The "WIFE" and I have decided on a huge rear projection instead of a FP. I was considering the InFocus X1 but then I started explaining everything and when she heard how mucha replacement bulb cost, she flipped out. She said that she would rather get a HUGE TV and not get a projector. So these are my questions:

    1. Which brand of TV are the best around the 54"-65" size? We don't want to spend more than $2000.00 on the beast. I've heard Mitsubishi and Hitachi. I've had Toshiba TV's for the longest and I like them. Do they make any good Rear Projection sets?

    2. How hard is it to frame a room? The area in the basement that we will use in the house I'm buying is approx. 15' x 25' The back of the room will have a pool table. It won't be a Theater only room. =( My father in law said that he would help me one day every weekend. How fast would we be able to frame the room at this pace? he's very handy, i'm not =) He said he would teach me along the way.

    3. I like the way that Randy has his theater with t he TV in the wall. Is this a feasible solution? I really like the way it looks and how it still looks like a theater screen within the wall. Thoughts?

    If I have anymore questions, I'm sure you guys will give me great advice. Thanks guys!

    -Ramon O. Valera
     
  2. Jack Shappa

    Jack Shappa Second Unit

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    If you're going to watch normal TV and movies (i.e. several hours every day), you made the right choice. If you're using it as a "movie theatre" (a couple hours a day tops) I'd say reconsider FP. For $2000 you could get a nice digital projector and a replacement bulb (for instace, an L300U w/ Bulb) and you're looking at close to 10,000 hours of time... That's a movie every day for 15 years. And the screen size really makes you feel like you're at the movies...

    - Cryo
     
  3. Glenise

    Glenise Supporting Actor

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    Randy has a nice looking room!
     
  4. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    How many hours do plan on putting on the TV/FP in a months time?

    With the X1 at under 1k, you can buy 3 additional bulbs, still be under 2k and that will give you a total of roughly 10,000 hours (based on 2,500 hours per bulb). That's a lot of viewing time.

    A 54" or 65" TV is nice, but I'd reconsider. Nothing beats a huge screen for movies. I went from a 46" RPTV to an 80" screen and it's hands down the best upgrade I've ever made (less the dedicated room). Don't let the price of replacement blubs turn you off to FP.

    I gather that because this will be in your basement this is not something for everyday viewing, correct?


    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  5. Ramon O. Valera

    Ramon O. Valera Stunt Coordinator

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    Another bit you guys should know. I would also be doing alot of gaming on this set. At least an hour a day. Will a set suffer burn in? or would a FP be better for gaming. Forgive the "newbie"ness!

    -Ramon
     
  6. Glenise

    Glenise Supporting Actor

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    A big screen for gaming is awesome.
    I have a 5 year old cousin and hooked up a Dreamcast and he didn't want to leave.
     
  7. Nick P

    Nick P Second Unit

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    Hi Ramone,

    1) All three brands you listed are good choices. I have a Panasonic 56" widescreen myself and love it.

    2) It's not too difficult to frame a room. I'd never done it before either and I framed a basement room at my old house in 2 days by myself. In my second house I had the builder do it though. [​IMG]

    3) I'm not a big fan of doing anything in-wall. TVs or speakers but that's just my opinion. I'd still consider front projection if I were you unless you will be using it for everyday TV viewing like others have said. I would get one myself if I had the spare cash.
     
  8. Ed O'Neill

    Ed O'Neill Second Unit

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    If you do go with a rptv and can afford it buy a Pioneer Elite. Hands down the best rptv.

    I however went for second best MItsubishi 65".I couldn't afford the Pioneer Elite.

    Hope this helps
    ED
     
  9. Rich Sk

    Rich Sk Extra

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    My two cents:
    1. I have a 55" Mitsu, and so far love it. Myself and two friends have the platinum, and another friend has the diamond (2003 models). None of us have any complaints so far.
    2. My room is about the same dimensions you mentioned (mine = 15 feet by 25 feet). The TV sits at one end of the long dimension, and if I had a pool table behind the couch on the other end, the couch would be way too close to the TV for my liking. But, that's just me.
    3. Framing isn't that difficult, but the overall project can be a pain without doing some homework first. Figure out the smartest electrical circuitry for the room (do you want to leave some Romex in the ceiling in case you decide on installing the projector later? Will the whole room be on one circuit, or just the HT components in the front of the room? etc). Are you going to do any sound proofing? If you have the time to search this forum, there is a lot of help to be found.
    3. TV in the wall: my Mitsubishi TV is about 28 inches deep. The wall the TV is on is an exterior wall in the basement, so if I were to put the TV in the wall, I'd be losing over 2 feet once I framed the wall out 28 inches for the pocket for the TV. If you have a utility room or something behind, your situation would be easier to deal with. Also keep in mind that you would need to have access to the rear of the TV and components to access cables easily.

    I'm just about done with my basement family room which I framed, installed a 55" TV, in-wall entertainment center, and 7.1 speaker system. Feel free to send me an email if you care to hear more lessons learned.
     
  10. Larry*S

    Larry*S Agent

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    Framing isn,t that bad, but I hate the spackling. Its messy and if you dont do it every day, the sheetrock seems will be obvious. If your father in law is good at it, let him do it. If your covering the walls with some type of fabric, paneling... then the spackling wont make much of a difference.

    also, as far as the pool table goes, make sure you set it up in a way that you can play comfortably. Make sure you can make all shots with out the walls interfereing. dont know if you have a pool table yet, but they do come in diff sizes to accomodate diff sized rooms.

    Instead of putting my pool table in the basement, I just put it in the dining room, hell, i never used the dining room anyway, and I made it kinda classy looking.

    as far as how long does it take, with 2 guys working, all materials and tools present. maybe a weekend to frame, a weekend to sheet rock and spackle (need to allow time for spackle to dry inbetween sanding, so may take a little longer. Need to put a ceiling up.

    consider wiring, lighting and all that prior to framing, sheet rock... alot easier if you have it all planned out prior, than as your going along, cause trust me, you'll probably forget something (like i did) and you'll probably change your mind several times as your going along (like I did)

    but its great as you see it all coming together.

    Im in the same boat as you. Ive just finished framing, sheer rock & ceiling. Im in the middle of spackling ( which I stink at)Ive accumulated several battle wounds (black nail from the hammer, 4 stitches from a piece of metal, several splinters) but its all fun. Ive just orderd fabric samples for drapes, wall covering... so i guess im in the decorating phase now ( ive also changed my minde several times ). My only problem, is I dont even have a projector, sound system, or screen yet. Anyway, enough of me rambling on.

    Do you have your pool table already?

    larry*s
     
  11. Randy Laporte

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    Hi Ramon
    I replied back to your email, I even sent some pics. My TV is Mits 65 inch HDTV widescreen, the pics don't really do it any justice. I used fiber optic for the sound, component video cables for my progressive scan and (forgot the guage)really thick Monster cable speaker wire for all the wiring in the walls with 14K gold banana clip outlets in the wall to plug speakers in. My email goes into more detail.
    Randy
    my theater
     
  12. BrandonB

    BrandonB Agent

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    I JUST got carpet installed in my basement that I started working on last December. Framing, by FAR, is the easiest part of the project. Everything after that gets progressively harder until you are ready to paint. That was such a releif!

    Definitely plan out your electrical. Also think of how you are going to heat and cool the room. Run a phone jack prior to sheetrocking. Decide if you want the convenience of a drop ceiling or the beauty of a sheetrocked ceiling. I opted for sheetrock and have great advice if you do too. After you frame and wire everything, buy you some PVC pipe with some elbows and run these over the frame. I have a recessed box in one wall for all my components and my TV in another area. I ran the PVC pipe from the garage side (behind the box) to where the TV is. This way, if I ever need to run additional wire, I have easier access. I also put a flip down back on my recessed box so that I can easily get to everything. Put lots of thought into everything before you do it. It was hard for me too because I was so anxious. But after the first 3-4 months went by and I realized how long it was going to take me, I started really thinking things through - it pays off.

    And Larry, I had to tell you, but sanding stinks worse than mudding. I went through 17 gallons of mud and I went WAY overboard. Use as sparingly as possible. And just wait until you have to sand the ceiling. I was tempted to pay someone, but I made it that far without that, so I wasn't giving it.

    Good Luck!!
     
  13. Jack Ferry

    Jack Ferry Stunt Coordinator

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    Good tips, Larry and Brandon. I'm at one of the fun stages: destroying parts of the basement. I just tore out a 1960's wet bar that took up half the room. There's nothing quite like smacking apart an eyesore that you've always hated.
     
  14. Ramon O. Valera

    Ramon O. Valera Stunt Coordinator

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  15. Ramon O. Valera

    Ramon O. Valera Stunt Coordinator

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    I forgot to add that my father-in-law is a liscenced electrician. He will do all of the electrical work. Thank God.
     
  16. Gareth_Thompson

    Gareth_Thompson Auditioning

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    I framed out, ran electrical work and hung dry-wall myself for my basement and then paid a professional to come and do the taping/mudding/spackling/hang doors/trim work. As long as you get most things straight and hang the dry-wall without too many gaps (the taping and mudding hides A LOT of mistakes) a professional can get the rest done really quickly and make it look great.
     
  17. Ramon O. Valera

    Ramon O. Valera Stunt Coordinator

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    Gareth,

    how much did the professional cost to do that work and how long did he/they take?

    Thanks!
    -Ramon
     
  18. Gareth_Thompson

    Gareth_Thompson Auditioning

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    Hi Ramon,

    The contractor took a week to do the mud/tape/texture of the walls. They made a really nice finish and i cant see any seams at all.

    The doors and trim took 2 more days.

    I paid $1875 (US) for all this work but if you can build stud walls yourself then you could probably do the trim/doors yourself. I would imagine the price could be reduced by 1/3 - 1/2 from the original if you did that.

    Gareth
     
  19. Frank joe

    Frank joe Stunt Coordinator

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    make a list of all the thing you will need before framing everything out. mabey a few 20amp electrical outlets would be nice to make sure nothing else is plugged into you home theatre lines. in wall speaker cable. i like my drop celing the best instead of regular sheet rock. in wall dvd shelves. think and plan it all out first, helps alot. frank
     

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