Question: Why, In Many Cases, Do Outtakes & Unused Bonus Material Look Awful On DVDs?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by David Von Pein, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    I would have thought a newer film made in 2002 or 2003 would have all crystal-clear video PQ. But I've noticed (as most of you have noticed, no doubt, as well) that many times the deleted scenes or extended scenes, etc. that are placed onto DVDs as "Bonus Footage" looks really crappy. Looks like it's degraded two decades right out of the camera.

    I'm wondering why this is?
     
  2. Anthony Neilson

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    It would depend at what stage of post-production the material is cut. Most of this stuff hasn't been graded (balanced for colour)like the film itself and most of it hasn't gone to print, so what you're seeing is lifted straight from the digital tape used for editing.
    It's not seen as cost effective to go through the full process simply for the extra features on a DVD.
     
  3. Bleddyn Williams

    Bleddyn Williams Supporting Actor

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    I believe another factor can be a very low bitrate allocated to these, to allow better quality for the feature itself.

    I remember Scream 3 had a very blocky look to its deleted scenes which I thought was as much due to compression as a poor source.
     
  4. David_Blackwell

    David_Blackwell Screenwriter

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    Yep, budget constraints on producing the DVD, lower bit rates, and the feature being teh most important thing on the DVD are the factors on why some delted scenes don't look too good. Some delted scenes are included as an afterthought in the process of producing some DVDs without bothering to clean up or color correct the cut footage.
     
  5. Benjamin Ricci

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    More often than not, these are just low-res Avid spit-outs. The Dogma SE is a good example of this, where they used low-res Avid outputs rather than cleaned up versions, much to the dismay of the DVD producers and Vincent Periera.
     
  6. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Producer
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    Benjamin is correct. I'm actually finishing up editing a film on the Avid right now, and all of the rough cuts I've taken home to look at look like the deleted scenes on DVD.

    For films that do not undergo the DI process, the footage is scanned into the Avid at lower resolutions to save space and to allow for faster working (less data, less time to load). If these scenes are deleted before the film is released, chances are the negative was never cut for those sequences, so the only thing out there of the scene assembled is the Avid assembly. I can't imagine many studios wanting to spend the money to put deleted scenes that are not going into the film to make a negative cut. If you see deleted scenes missing music or sound effects, that's why - the scene was deleted before it was finished.

    Still, even with lower quality, it's great to have this outtakes. As I've started using it more and more, I've become a big fan of the Avid, and the video output is no small reason. My first high school and early college projects were shot on film and cut on film, which was a great learning experience and a great way to work, but unless you have access to a video transfer facility, which can be expensive, there's no practical way to make video dubs of stuff being cut on a flatbed, other than to point a camcorder at the screen. On the Avid, at the end of the day when I've made my last edit, before I leave the editing suite I make a videotape of the film up to that point and take it home and look at it there a few times, and I always catch things I didn't notice in the editing room. I really can't express how beneficial it was to have that as an option.

    Anyhow, sorry for the rant.. hope this answers the question without boring everyone to sleep.
     

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