Question Regarding Weight Of Monitor

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by John D Peterson, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. John D Peterson

    John D Peterson Auditioning

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    I am in the planning stages of a HT project. I stumbled upon this forum yesturday and thought you guys may help me with a question. I plan to enclose a recessed wall (right where the builder places the fireplace option on my home plan) and build an area for HT equipment. My plans are to have the monitor (either tube or projection unit for now) raised about 36" and recessed into the wall. Right now I have a 36" Panasonic Tube that weighs at least a 100lbs. This will be placed in the recessed area until I can replace it with something better. The question is, what material should I used to support the monitor on so that the weight will not scratch the base of the recessed area. If I use drywall and then paint it, I would think the weight of the monitor would really scratch and mess up the paint and dry wall when moving it around for set up or problem solving (messing around with wires in the back). It currently is in a entertainment center and the small feet on the monitor have scratched up the wood they sit on. My second plans are to use tile that matches the floor in the living room if the dry wall will not hold up. Any suggestions would be appreciated?

    Thanks in advance, John
     
  2. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Drywall is much too fragile to set a tv on of any size. Your best bet would be to go with well supported wood or tile.

    However, to avoid scratches you might want to invest in some of those stick-on furniture slides:

    [​IMG]

    Just stick 'em on your TV's feet. You can find them anywhere... I've even seen them at my local grocery store. They come in assorted sizes and shapes.

    Keep us posted on how things turn out.
     
  3. John D Peterson

    John D Peterson Auditioning

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    Dave, Thanks for the reply. If drywall was to be used, it would have been supported by plywood and good framing. I guess I will describe what else I had planned. The front wall surface will be covered with manufactured stone veneer. Such as that from Eldorado Stone or Coronado Stone. I would use a matching tile or even flagstone if not the drywall as the surface that the monitor rests on. Dry wall would be easy to install and paint. But I had expected drywall to be scratched easily since the dings in the drywall I have encountered in my home since new. The builder as an option to frame the same wall in for a ET. Very cheesy looking but functional. They are using just drywall supported by framing (studs) only where the monitor would sit. I feel sorry for the buyers of that $1500 option.

    Yes, I will post my build and results. I wish there were more posts of non-hardcore full ET room projects. My ET center (physical space) will not be as hardcore from what I have found here at the forum. The room I am constructing this in is a great room with the kitchen on one side and large windows/door out to back yard. This doesn't allow me to plan for a great acoustics ET center but it will suffice. I'll start planning now for the next home though. [​IMG]
     
  4. Juan Castillo

    Juan Castillo Second Unit

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    Drywall will not scratch, it will indent, rip, crumble.. You are missing the point by assuming it would have proper weight carrying support underneath it. Even with that, the weight of the TV will do worse than scratch. It will be like a sheetrock sandwich. Just use a nice piece of plywood, with trim on the edge, and paint to match. Scatches won't be unfixable, like with a veneer, or some hardwood stains, just repaint and whoala... or use those feet, though, let paint on ply, dry really well, otherwise the weight of the TV will press those feet into the paint even after it feels dry to the touch.
     

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