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Question regarding HDMI Splitters and simultaneous output.

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Walter Kittel, Oct 31, 2018.

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  1. Message #1 of 11 Oct 31, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
    Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Producer

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    Well I just lost the HDMI output on an A/V Receiver that I recently purchased, following a similar episode on my prior A/V receiver. (Both times involving lightning and loss of power to the residence.) The audio component works just fine, since it is split off before the HDMI output which connects to a display device.

    What I would like to attempt is to connect an external HDMI device that provides simultaneous output of the source signal to two destinations. I would connect one output to an input on the A/V receiver and permit it to decode and produce the sound. The other output would be connected to the display for the video portion of the signal. This is an interim solution until I decide how to proceed with an A/V purchase (and maybe a new surge suppressor.) I would manually switch the input to the splitter depending upon what material I was viewing (selecting which source cable to plug into the HDMI splitter.)

    Pretty damn frustrating. I am not sure that a new suppressor would address the problem considering that it only appears to affect the HDMI output. (???)

    EDIT: Sure I can google for them, but I am posting this to ask about first hand experience with said devices, and partly to bitch about my receiver. :angry:

    - Walter.
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Second receiver? Thanks for confirming yet again why I keep my system HDMI-free! [​IMG]

    Haven’t used them myself (did I mention that I’m HDMI free? :) ), butI believe something like this is what you’re looking for. Reportedly they will extract the digital audio signal while passing the HDMI signal through.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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  4. Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Producer

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    Living in an apartment, more comprehensive solutions may not be feasible. I am considering replacing my current (and very old) surge protector. I'm not certain how much protection a new surge protector can provide specifically on HDMI connections as I have read that lightning can induce voltage spikes in long HDMI cables (which I have running to my projector). Need to do more research on this.

    I found an inexpensive HDMI device that repeats the signal to two outputs. I have one output feeding an HDMI input on the receiver and the other feeding a display, so in the interim I can get sound from the receiver while viewing the front projector.

    - Walter.
     
  5. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    How old are your surge protectors? They supposedly degrade over time and should be replaced every so many years (about every five to seven, maybe).

    I wonder if a battery backup system would help. Particularly one that powers everything from the batteries, which are constantly charged by the power line. That way it's not a direct path from AC to device.
    https://www.cyberpowersystems.com/products/ups/pc-battery-backup/

    The key is to prevent the voltage surge from entering the device from the power lines of any of the connected devices. If it's arrested, then can't get into the HDMI cables and electronics.

    Have you looked at the warranty for your surge protector? They typically come with something like 5 yr / $5000 guarantees. Maybe that would replace your gear?

    Or if all else fails, a renter's insurance policy that replaces lightning damaged electronics?

    I've fortunately not lost gear to home electrical problems in many years, and never to lightning strikes. That's got to be frustrating!
     
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  6. Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Producer

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    My surge protector is probably at least 10 to 15 years old. (I have been into Home Theater a lot of years.) :)

    I have a UPS on the front projector. I kind of like the idea of putting one on the other electronics as well. About the only other pathway in at that point would be the cable connection (which I am assuming has some form of protection.)

    - Walter.
     
  7. John Dirk

    John Dirk Screenwriter
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    Wow. That's got to be frustrating. Without the option for whole-house surge protection I would probably be replacing the UPS units every 5 years. They are cheap compared to the gear they protect.
     
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  8. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    You’ve now got me thinking about my house full of (mumble mumble) years old surge protectors. :)
     
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  9. xx Brian xx

    xx Brian xx Stunt Coordinator

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    Surge protectors are constantly handling small surges that would normally lower the life expectancy of electronics and the surge protector will eventually wear down and be less effective. In your case though since the HDMI inputs/output keep going out my guess is that you have an issue with the surge coming through the cable / satellite box.

    I run the satellite incoming cable through a Panamax surge protector before it goes to the sat box. Then on the other side from the receiver to the TV, I run a HDBaseT HDMI extender that is grounded so no surges can pass between the TV and receiver. All components in the smart closet are plugged into one of two Panamax surge protectors.

    At our daughters house they lost a TV input and a few 50' HDMI cables before I swapped out the cable for an HDMI extender. Two years now and no more problems. Part of the problem at both locations is that we both have smart closets for the electronics and have to make 40 to 50 cable runs. If your electronics are all close it may not be cost effective to use a HDMI extender, you would want to look at HDMI surge protectors.

    I agree with DaveF, fix the cause of the issue before you spend more money on new gear.

    Brian
     
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  10. Message #10 of 11 Nov 4, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
    John Dirk

    John Dirk Screenwriter
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    Yea, you should plan to replace them all. I've spent hundreds repairing or replacing microwaves, TV antennas and more over the years. Depending on where you live it's a serious threat.

    There are a few tiers between consumers and proper surge protection.

    1. Outside (Power entry point) Unfortunately your local municipality controls this point. Installing surge protection here requires their cooperation because power must be cutoff from their end to make the installation safe. It requires a scheduled appointment with your provider. Most won't cooperate because they want to sell you their solution. It comes with the same [quality] protector they would have installed at the meter except they will only agree to LEASE it to you. That's right, you can't buy it even though it costs about $200.00 or less if you looked.
    2. Whole House Protection - I installed this in my previous two homes. You do it at the Service Panel and it's not a beginners job. You need to know your way around 120 VAC.
    3. Local Level Protection - This is the last line of defense and the level of protection available to all consumers. You should have local level protection preceding all of your valued equipment.
     
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  11. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Producer
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    There are usually some good deals on these during Black Friday.
     

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