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Question on HDMI connection

Discussion in 'Displays' started by James Herrod, Aug 29, 2005.

  1. James Herrod

    James Herrod Stunt Coordinator

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    I just purchased a Sony 50" LCD HDTV with one HDMI input. I will soon be upgrading to high-def through cox cable and the set-top box has an HDMI port, but since I will be running the audio through the A/V receiver (non-HDMI), and not directly to the TV, would HDMI only be useful to me if I was running the video AND audio directly to the TV? I will most likely be upgrading my receiver anyway, but I noticed, at least with the Denon receivers, only the top-of-the-line models have HDMI inputs.
     
  2. John Whittle

    John Whittle Stunt Coordinator

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    There have been several links posted in other threads on DVI/HDMI. HDMI** comes in several flavors: single & dual link and the connector can also have an analogue version.

    Check your Sony Manual, usually HDMI also have left and right audio connections associated with it and if the COX box has HDMI, then it also has audio out. If it has DVI then audio is included on the cable and you'd have to patch it back out of the Sony or from an additional output from the COX box. Once you have all the pieces of your puzzle, it'll be clear. At least you don't have to go thru the additional learning curve of the 4805 which has an M1DA input that needs an adapter to HDMI or DVI.

    **through the miracle of advanced aging I switched HDMI and DVI. HDMI comes as one flavor and HDMI comes in single and dual link and also an analog version.
     
  3. RoyGBiv

    RoyGBiv Stunt Coordinator

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    HDMI is a way to carry a digital video and audio signal to your TV. Some people believe that using digital signals all the way will result in a better picture, but others feel that component (analog) cables are just as good. If you will never be listening to the TV's speakers, you don't need to get the audio portion of the signal to the TV. But who realistically never listens to the TV's built-in speakers? It would seem to make sense if your TV and cable box both have HDMI to use an HDMI connector. One single wire going from box to the TV providing video and audio. Then you can still connect your cable box audio output to your receiver. This way, you can watch TV with the TVs speakers but still use the receiver's sound when it matters to you.

    SMK
     
  4. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    I also recommend that you use the HDMI input (and, no, it doesn't matter if you aren't using the audio signal that's also sent). HDMI was an obvious improvement over component in my system. To test yourself, simply hook it up both ways simultaneously, and switch between the component and HDMI inputs on your TV for a direct A:B comparison (after calibrating both inputs separately if you want everything to be optimal for this comparison).
     
  5. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    I use the HDMI output with my Cox DVR, and the optical for sound to my reciever. But, there are some channels where the audio simply doesn't come over the digital connection. For that, I also have a good old pair of analogs L and R connected to the receiver. My receiver automatically chooses digital if it's available and resorts to analog if it's not.

    Be aware that your TV needs to be on before the cable box to allow it time to establish HDCP using HDMI. Some sets are worse than others. My plasma needs 4 or 5 seconds before I power on the cable box.

    Typically, you'll need to go into the setup of the set top box to choose which resolutions you want it to output. Some TVs have difficulty trying to switch resolutions constantly so you may have to limit it to 1080i or 720p. Lower rez material gets upconverted.

    It's definitely worth comparing to see which gives the best picture, but many cable boxes don't support both outputs simultaneously.
     

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