Question for those who used rigid foam to insulate a basement

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Luke_Y, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. Luke_Y

    Luke_Y Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2001
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0
    Question for those who used rigid foam to insulate a basement

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I plan to insulate the poured concrete walls in my basement with rigid XPS foam. If you have used this method, what did you use for adhesive? How long did it take to set-up and hold the panels in place? What did you use to hold them until the adhesive set-up?

    I wont be able to friction fit them top and bottom as there is a 1ft high knee wall (dont know what else to call it) at the top of my poured wall before the 1st level floor joists to give the basement an extra foot of depth. I will have to insulate that area differently so the panels will only go to the top of the concrete.
     
  2. Luke_Y

    Luke_Y Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2001
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anyone..... ? [​IMG]
     
  3. DaveHo

    DaveHo Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is a Liquid Nails product designed for foam. It'll be sticky enough to hold the panels until it sets. You shouldn't need to do anything other than pressing the panel to the wall.

    -Dave
     
  4. MarkMel

    MarkMel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    1,839
    Likes Received:
    106
    When you use liquid nails, there is one thing you can do to facilitate curing. Squirt out a nice pattern on the back of your foam. Push it into place. Pull the panel back off, this will flash cure it. Then put it back into position. I think it may explain this on the tube.
     
  5. Luke_Y

    Luke_Y Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2001
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks guys. Whats the cleanest way to cut this stuff? Can you score it and snap it sort of like drywall, or do you have to cut it all the way through with something?
     
  6. MarkMel

    MarkMel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    1,839
    Likes Received:
    106
    From Corning;

    FOAMULARĀ® rigid foam insulation contains literally hundreds of millions of densely packed air cells. Since air is nature's most effective insulator, the sheer volume of this compressed trapped air gives FOAMULAR insulation exceptional thermal performance.

    FOAMULAR is also "hydrophobic," meaning it's practically impossible for it to be penetrated by moisture. Moisture penetration can cause a permanent loss of R-value, and after repeated penetration the insulation can be practically useless.

    If you're installing FOAMULAR insulation yourself, you should know that it weighs considerably less than plywood, OSB or other non-insulation material so it's easier, faster and safer to install. Plus, the product's built-in rigidity means it can be scored and snapped, cut, or sawed with common tools. Sagging and settling are never a problem. We also offer PROPINKĀ® insulating sheathing which is manufactured with extra toughness for new construction applications. Complete installation instructions are available by clicking on the applications for each FOAMULAR product listed below.
     
  7. Luke_Y

    Luke_Y Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2001
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have another question.

    I purchased STYROFOAM Residential Sheathing extruded polystyrene insulation. The foam insulation board has a thin plastic film on both sides. No-one had the plain STYROFOAM Tongue and Groove extruded polystyrene without the plastic film on both sides. The sales people at all the stores said it was the same stuff other than the plastic film. the DOW website says the plastic film reduces job site damage to the insulation boards.

    My question is, do I remove the plastic film on both sides or at least the side that I am gluing to the concrete walls? It is already slightly peeling on the edges and I cant imagine the adhesive will hold the best.

    This is the stuff: Link

    Was told its the same as this: (except for the thin plastic film) Link
     
  8. JeffCar

    JeffCar Agent

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    I used Liquid Nails (the one specially formulated for foam is the only one to use... the rest will eat through the foam. Lay on a good pattern and press. It had no trouble holding to my poured walls.

    Jeff
     

Share This Page