Question for Nurses

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Clay Kilpatrick, May 2, 2003.

  1. Clay Kilpatrick

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    I am considering going to school for nursing, but I am not sure what would be better. I could go to ASU for 3 years, and when I am done, and have a BSN, or go to a community college for two, and have an RN. Is a BSN necessary? It would cost me 12,000, rather than 4,000, which is good, but I have the money, so it's not the biggest issue in the world, but that is a lot of money. And an extra year of my life.

    Any advice?

    Clay
     
  2. Scott Barnhart

    Scott Barnhart Stunt Coordinator

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    Clay,

    I forwarded this to my wife, who has a BSN and has been an RN for 15 years. I will post any reply from her on here when I get it.
     
  3. Jacinto

    Jacinto Second Unit

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    Clay,

    My wife's a nurse, so I'll tell you what I know, as she's not around right now to ask. There are some hospitals (at least here) that will only hire nurses who have a BSN. My wife works at Children's Hospital, and they do require a BSN for their nurses. Also, I'm pretty sure starting pay rates are generally a bit higher for those with a BSN. The BSN will also cut down on school time if you later want to pursue another future degree like a masters or a Nurse Practioner, etc.
     
  4. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    Just asked my spouse, who is too busy to come answer herself. She says "go for the BSN". (she is 10 yr RN)

    My thoughts are, one more year of college may be a good thing. Heck, wish I could do it now.

    You may want to consider getting your CNA and working part time while in school. Maybe find out what classes your JC offers that would also apply/transfer to the BSN and enroll in those while working. Get an inside view.

    CNA only takes a few months to get as I recall.
     
  5. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Clay - I've been in nursing for 20 years. Here's the deal:

    Decide what your long-term goals are. If you'll be satisfied with working as a staff nurse throughout your career (and there is nothing wrong with that), there is no point in getting the BSN.

    However, if you have other plans, such as administration, education, advanced practice, etc., grab the BSN.

    Contrary to common belief, Associate degreed RNs earn the same income as Bachelor's degreed RNs (assuming they are in the same position). The key difference is in the opportunites available - as mentioned above - for the BSN grad.

    I've never heard of a hospital that hires only BSNs; they wouldn't be able to keep their doors open. In fact, in today's market, you could likely walk into any hospital of your choosing (with your Associates) and be offered a position.

    Feel free to email me or post here if you have any more questions.

    Good luck!

    Jon
     
  6. Scott Barnhart

    Scott Barnhart Stunt Coordinator

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    Clay,

    Here is the answer from my wife, a long time BSN/RN. It dovetails completely with what Jon said.

     
  7. James Edward

    James Edward Supporting Actor

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    My wife is also has a BSN- but she went for it knowing she wanted to teach nursing eventually. As said above, you will generally make the same amount with either degree. The one thing that earned my wife an extra $700.00 'bonus' each year was getting certified in her particular area of nursing.

    There is such a nursing shortage today, I doubt any hospital would try and hold out for BSN degreed nurses.
     
  8. Devin U

    Devin U Second Unit

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    I work in Health care here in the Phx area (not a RN, yet) and what everyone else is echoing is pretty much true. a BSN will get you a desk job. the good thing about the community coleges around here is, they do a great job training nurses. all the Maricopa Community college districs have higher NCLE-RN pass rates that ASU last time I checked. and after the assocates, you can go back to asu and get a BSN in like a year or two. or you couuld do the rn-bsn-msn programme. one of my instructors was telling us its a good way to go, since only 3% of RNs in AZ have masters degrees.
     
  9. Clay Kilpatrick

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    Well, I went and did some more inquiring at the community colleges, and it looks like it would take three years to get my RN there as well. So until I read this, I was set on the BSN.

    I don't however want a desk job, as I decided to be a nurse because I wanted a job where I could help people. I still will probably go for the BSN, if I am going to waste three years, I want the highest degree I can get.

    An all of this is only if I smart enough to handle it. [​IMG] Thanks for the advice.

    Clay
     
  10. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    Reading your reply; I'd say get the BSN - Keep your options open.

    You may say for now you want to help people. (and I commend you) but over time you may change.

    Patients are fairly simple to deal with, it is their families who drive my wife nuts. She specializes in Peds.

    It does not help that she is 30 and looks 20. She is the charge nurse and often gets asked for someone 'a bit more experienced'.

    Anyway, I'll avoid shareing my wifes rant with you. Just bear in mind that someday a desk job may start to look pretty good compared to unappreciative family, demanding parients, and 'god complex' doctors.

    Not to mention the emotional strenght. Thank God that on my worst day at work none of my customers are likely to die. I am too emotionally weak to ever handle my wifes job.
     
  11. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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