Question for gamers with HDTV or SD Projection TVs

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Michael_Victor, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. Michael_Victor

    Michael_Victor Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello,

    I puchased a SD 70" Mitsu about 3 to 4 years ago and an 65" HDTV Mutsi about 2 to 3 years ago and was told when I purchased the SD that I could not use a game system such as PlayStation or XBox or anything like that on these types of TV's because the graphics will screw up either the cannons or the screen itself. Anyone know the validity of this statement?
     
  2. Steven_Lazarus

    Steven_Lazarus Stunt Coordinator

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    Blah!
    I think you'll be fine, Just don't pause the game for extended periods of time leaving a static image on the screen. It's also recommended that you don't have static images on the screen such as health bars for hours on end etc... so switch games on ocassion and no LAN parties and I think you'll be fine. Just turn it off if you need to take an extended break! JMO...... [​IMG]
     
  3. Steven_Lazarus

    Steven_Lazarus Stunt Coordinator

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    One other thing, another remedy to changing health/life bar location on the screen to avoid burn-in problems is just switching zoom modes on the set every so often... [​IMG]
     
  4. Michael_Victor

    Michael_Victor Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the info. I was thinking this was the case but I wanted another persons opinion.

    Mike
     
  5. Jean D

    Jean D Screenwriter

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    agreed. it takes hours for "burn-in" to take effect. if your playing first person shooters like Halo with a fixed image like the tracking circle on the bottom left of the screen. thats basically what you have to be worried about. Fixed images. but again, it takes hours. I have a 55" HD rear projection Mits. and I'm not worried about it.
     
  6. Michael_Victor

    Michael_Victor Stunt Coordinator

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    You bring up a good point though. Say for example, I am playing a game (not that I would play for hours at a time), which has a set section where it has either a number that doesn't change or a graphic that stays in the same place, as long as every-so-often, there is a break where it may show a movie-like scene and then breaks back, I should be fine? Thanks again fellas.


    mike
     
  7. benGraham

    benGraham Auditioning

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    So then play halo for like 2 hours and then stop. Since I am in the market for a tv that i something to think about.
     
  8. Jean D

    Jean D Screenwriter

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    Theoretically, yes. Ive yet to have a problem. as long as the image changes every so often you should be fine. its the same thing with plasma's and the top and bottom news flash bars on news stations for people who just leave news channels on in the background and watch the stock market bar, they have to be careful.
     
  9. Michael_Victor

    Michael_Victor Stunt Coordinator

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    Funny you mention the ticker given my profession. I'd prefer streaming online when I am not at work. Thanks all for the info again. very useful.

    Mike
     
  10. Jean D

    Jean D Screenwriter

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    The newer plasma's are better now, it takes a lot longer for the burn in to take effect. Assuming your buying a more expensive plasma, and not some $3K Gateway one. I think as long as it does true HD (at least 1080i) the burn-in problem is less likely for longer periods of time. Cause the older plamas were only SD I believe. dont quote me on that one, Im not positive.
     
  11. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    I've been playing all sorts of videogames on our 65" Tosh HDTV for hours on end. When I was playing HALO the first time, I couldn't put it down until I got about 4-6 hours through it (especially during Legendary[​IMG] ). I was never scared of burn in because I had always had my contrast and brightness low enuff to prevent that in the first place.
    To sum it all up, if a set is not in "torch" mode, I think u'll be fine.
     
  12. Chad Ferguson

    Chad Ferguson Supporting Actor

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    Perhaps I'm wrong but widescreen bars can burn in as well correct? And since a lot of movies are now 2:35 if that doesn't burn in, then games are very little worry as well?
     
  13. Jean D

    Jean D Screenwriter

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    Chad, Im not sure either, but I would assume the same thing. I have a widescreen hd rptv; I know if I use my vertical bars for regular tv they shift back and fourth slowly over time (also, they are grey), and that always made me wonder about the widescreen bars, and how come they dont do that.
     
  14. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Widescreen bars *can* absolutely "burn in", but it is worth noting that it isn't the bars that are actually doing the burning in. It's the used picture area.

    All burn-in is, is wear of the phosphors, which is the fastest with bright material. This is why turning down your white levels to acceptable (and hopefully calibrated) levels is very helpful. Out of the box, sets are WAY too bright, and will much more quickly wear. When we talk about "burn-in" we are usually talking about identifiable wear of fixed images, rather than the more general wear. When watching widescreen movies, the only wear that is happening (to the phosphor) is in the active picture area, so what may occur over very long periods of time is wear of that picture area, while the black bars will not wear at all. Another thing to note, is that gray bars are an attempt to minimize this problem, by in essence wearing the gray areas about as much as the picture area, to try to keep all the wear across the whole screen constant.

    Anyway, please read the Master Burn-in Thread, it's at the top of this forum, and covers all this over and over again.

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=105385
     

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