Question about Windows Networking in professional Environment

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Vince Maskeeper, Apr 7, 2004.

  1. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    I'm sort of a low level guy in network administration- so I don't know the ins & outs as much as I should. However, I have noticed we have this problem at work, and I'm wondering what the status quo solution to it usually is:

    1) How do you deal with user permissions? It seems like if you don't make a user the Admin of their local machine, half the software doesn't run correctly (i.e. they have no rights to make simple changes to user options, and changes in programs don't stick, it won't let them run scripts on websites). Some apps don't work at all because they're not granted writer permissions to certain directories.

    2) We would rather make them users or power users- but not only do some applications not run correctly... but it also seems that "user" level permissions as granted from the server versus "user" as granted on the local machine seem to be different. I don't know how to explain it- but if the user is added to the local machine as a "user" the account bahaves differently than if they are NOT added to the machine at all, and just log in - allowing the server to allocate them as a "user".

    So it got me wondering- does every network admin just make their users an admin on their local machine, or do you regulate things via group policies? It seems my boss keeps insisting that the best way is to make them Admin over local machine, and have ghost profiles ready to backup whatever the F**k-up.

    Just trying to learn more about the right way to do things.

    -vince
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I don't have answers to many of your questions, but please don't make them all administrators. That's really just asking for trouble. I really thought that making them power-users would work. What programs are the troubles with? If they involve the network perhaps you could add them to the group that's allowed to change network settings (the name escapes me right now). Also, are all the machines XP Pro or do you have other systems running too?
     
  3. Tony Loewen

    Tony Loewen Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey Vince, how are you?

    We have a similar problem here where I work, with some programs not running correctly unless you are an admin. One of our trainees just got back from our in-house schools and was talking about a new thing we are starting to try out. I can't for the life of me remember what it was called, but the idea behind it was that it was a windows program that opened up a virtual windows environment that they could then run other programs in (Virtual PC or Virtual Win... something like that). That way, employees can be given admin rights on this virtual environment, and the IT guys can set it up so that they can't really screw anything else up. Wish I could tell you more about it, but that's about all I know. Maybe something to look into?

    Tony
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    This is an interesting idea- although it seems odd, since I know that many major corporations administrate networks of hundreds and thousands of users under a Win environment- i find it impossible to believe these are more elegant solutions... I'm sure the key lies in group policies and pushing down software-- but I have a boss that only shows up to the office about 1/5th of the time, and I'm just an assistant level position, so I'm not in much position to be allowed to play or completely overhaul the network.

    But the virual machine idea is an interesting idea-- i'm just wondering how the "big boys" do their win networks.
     
  5. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Otherwise known as Thin Client computing. Best used where the end machines are low spec - or even better - dumb terminals (such as those made by WYSE). Citrix is probably the most commonly used system.
     

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