question about widescreen TV's?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ryan_x, Mar 17, 2002.

  1. ryan_x

    ryan_x Stunt Coordinator

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    While I am sure they are great for watching widescreen dvd's...but what about when your just watching plain old basic cable...is the picture stretched to fit the whole TV?...is there any black bars?
     
  2. Rod Melotte

    Rod Melotte Stunt Coordinator

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    You can streatch the picture to fit the full screen but the everybody is shore and fat. Or you can have the 4:3 center area filled in BUT if you watch a a lot of 4:3 it'll burn in the center because of the big black bars (actually wider then . . .bars).

    This - in MY opinion, you need to decided what you are going to watch mainly. That is why I went with a 4:3 format. It's large enough to watch widescreen with ease but mainly it's for 4:3 telecasts.
     
  3. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Ryan,

    widescreen sets give you several choices for handling 4/3 material.

    They can display it normally in the center with gray bars on the side. The gray bars are supposed to minimize burn-in, but some mfgs still recommend you only use this mode 10% of the time.

    They can do a uniform horizontal only stretch--everything will be short and fat, but no picture is lost at top and bottom.

    They can zoom the picture uniformly, stretching vertically as much as they do horizontally. This will fill the screen side to side, but the top and bottom of the picture will be cut off. The set will allow you to scroll the picture up and down so you can still see graphics like sports scores or stock scrawls at the top and bottom of the picture.

    They can do a "variable" stretch. This stretches more at the sides than in the center, so stuff in the center isn't short and fat, but stuff at the sides is. Different mfgs do this in different ways, some are less distracting than others. Toshiba, Sony, and Pioneer generally have better looking variable stretch modes than Mits or Hitachi.
     

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