Question about RAM specifications

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Jon_Are, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Looking to add some RAM, have narrowed my choices to three on the Crucial site.

    #1 is unbuffered and non-ecc ($80.99 for 512 MB)

    #2 is unbuffered and ecc ($103.99 for 512 MB)

    #3 is registered and ecc ($122.99 for 512 MB)



    The specifications are otherwise identical.

    What do these terms mean, and would I benefit from springing for either of the more expensive modules?

    Thanks,

    Jon
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I honestly cannot explain the terms, but here's what I can tell you. Those more expensive types are generally only used in servers and supercomputers. Typical RAM for users is unregistered and non-ecc.

    The ecc has to do with error correcting. I assume this means that the RAM has checks built into it for information coming into it and going out of it to make sure it is the same.
     
  3. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    ECC stands for error-correction control. When 8 bits are sent out or received, a ninth (check) bit is used to confirm the previous 8.

    Your motherboard specs will either allow ECC or not.

    When adding RAM, the best thing to do is to pull yours out, write down the mfg and #, and buy more of the same. Mixing brands might work, but might not.

    Glenn
     
  4. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Unless you run a server at work you'd want #1.
     
  5. Gregg Z

    Gregg Z Stunt Coordinator

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