Question about layer changes

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Clint B, Dec 22, 2001.

  1. Clint B

    Clint B Second Unit

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    Hi. I've noticed that there are a few DVD's out there (for example, Sting's "All This Time" concert DVD) that say they are dual layer, but there is no layer switch. I don't understand how that can be. If it's possible to have a dual layer disc with no layer switch, then why doesn't every studio manufacture all dual layer DVD's with no layer switch (or at least one that isn't detectable). I've seen some DVD's where you can't tell the switch is there, but there are some that it's very noticeable. Anyway, please educate me on this. Why have a layer switch if you don't need it?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Rain

    Rain Producer

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    Welcome to HTF, Clint. [​IMG]
    If the disc is truly dual layered, it MUST switch somewhere.
    I think that in the cases you mentioned, you are probably just not noticing it. Some DVDs handle it better than others. (Hardware can also be a factor, but I assume you're watching all your discs on the same set up.)
    I have several dual layered discs that I've watched more than once and can't find the layer change at all because they are so smooth.
    Why all dual layer discs aren't made with a smooth switch is one of those mysteries. Kind of like wondering why all DVDs don't have great transfers or great sound. In a perfect world, every DVD would be as well-made as possible, but alas that isn't the case.
     
  3. TyC

    TyC Stunt Coordinator

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    Perhaps the switch doesn't occur during the film, instead it happens somewhere less likely to be noticed, like a menu or an extra feature. However, this is just my speculation, I don't even know if this is possible.
     
  4. Rain

    Rain Producer

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    That's a good point, one I didn't even think of. Duh.

    It is possible to have the film entirely on one layer and the extras on the other.
     
  5. David Lambert

    David Lambert Executive Producer

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    A layer change doesn't have to be anywhere during any feature or supplement, for that matter.
    Example: Return To Oz (Anchor Bay release; live-action years-later sequel Wizard of Oz) features the WS version on one layer, and the FS version on the other layer. You never see a layer change anywhere, because you make your menu choice and it just takes you the the layer you need to be on for the choice you made!
    Layer changes are only required mid-feature when the feature physically takes up more room than the first layer can hold.
    What I think is MORE interesting is the number of discs in my collection that clearly (to me, anyway - based on lack of supplements and short running time on the feature) don't hold enough data to require a second layer, but the disc is clearly the gold-colored RSDL-style disc anyway!
    I don't have too many of these, but I figured one would be a curiosity, two an oddity. I can't think of a particular title sitting here, but I know I've seen these at least a half-dozen times while updating my collection database upon purchase of a new DVD!
     
  6. Clint B

    Clint B Second Unit

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    Thanks, everyone, for your help. It's starting to make more sense.

    Also, I wanted to mention to everyone that you need to make your voice heard on the thread that's insisting on OAR for all DVD's. I didn't start the thread, but it's something I believe in (as do many of you, I'm sure). Thank you, and good night!
     

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