Question about Jewish/Hebrew calendar

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Todd K, Aug 25, 2006.

  1. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello,

    Hopefully someone who's knowledgeable about the Jewish calendar can answer this question for me:

    Can you tell me what date on the Jewish calendar will correspond to this coming Sunday, the 27th of August, 2006? I think it's the year 5766, but I have no idea what month or day Sunday will be.

    Thanks for your attention!

    Todd
     
  2. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have found this online:

    http://www.hebcal.com/converter/

    This sort of eliminates my first question, but brings up another: I am trying to figure this out for a jewish friend's birthday present. It turns out August 27th converts to the 3rd day of Elul. However, according to this calculator, when she was born in 1976, this was the 1st day of Elul. So should I not even bother mentioning the Jewish date?

    Thanks again,
    Todd
     
  3. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sunday, the 27th of August, 2006 corresponds to 3 Elul, 5766
     
  4. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    The Hebrew calendar is based on lunar cycles, so you won't be able to corrolate Gregorian calendar birthdays to an annual Hebrew calendar date. [​IMG]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_calendar

    The "modern" form is a rule-based lunisolar calendar, akin to the Chinese calendar, measuring months defined in lunar cycles as well as years measured in solar cycles, and distinct from the purely lunar Islamic calendar and the almost entirely solar Gregorian calendar. Because of the roughly 11 day difference between twelve lunar months and one solar year, the calendar repeats in a Metonic 19-year cycle of 235 lunar months, with an extra lunar month added once every two or three years, for a total of seven times every nineteen years. As the Hebrew calendar was developed in the region east of the Mediterranean Sea, references to seasons reflect the times and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.
     
  5. Rod J

    Rod J Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Real Name:
    Rodney Jewett

    Here's a link to a birthday calendar http://www.chabad.org/calendar/birthday.asp. August 27, 1966 was Elul 1 or 2, 5736 depending on whether she was born before or after local sunset. Elul 1, 5766 is August 25, 2006. Elul 2 starts at local sunset Friday night.
     
  6. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the replies! So basically I'm thinking I should ignore the jewish date, since 3 Elul has really no meaning to her judaicly speaking.

    Or should I eliminate the gregorian date, since today is 1 Elul, her true hebrew calendar birthday, and give her the present today?
     
  7. Rod J

    Rod J Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Real Name:
    Rodney Jewett

    Right - 3 Elul isn't her birthday...[​IMG]
     
  8. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2003
    Messages:
    3,883
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The most amusing instance of Hebrew/Gregorian calendar mis-match that I can recall happened about 4 years ago, when the just-retired chief of staff of the Israeli military was petitioning to be allowed to run in the then-upcoming Knesset election. There's a law in Israel specifying a "cooling off period" for retired military personnel before they can run for the Knesset, but one (unintentionally hilarious) argument he made was that he would have met the required date according to the Hebrew calendar, even though he didn't meet it according to the Gregorian calendar!
     
  9. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,084
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Clearwater, FL
    Real Name:
    Joe Kauffman
    Generally, birthdays are celebrated by the Gregorian calendar date. The Jewish calendar is for religious ritual purposes, such as the dates of Jewish holidays or observing yartzeit (the anniversary of a death, in order to say a specific prayer).

    Now, just for reference, using the calendar converter from above to accurately determine someone's Jewish birthday, you would need to know the exact Gregorian date the person was born and whether it was before or after sunset. Then, once you determine the Jewish month and day, you can do the reverse lookup (you would need to know the proper Jewish year for that, since that changes in September/October).

    For example, I was born 13 November 1976 before sunset, which was 20 Cheshvan 5737. My next Jewish birthday will be sunset 10 Nov to sunset 11 Nov.

    It can be confusing, I know.

    And yes, I'll be 30.
     
  10. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks again, all, this has been most enlightening.

    But one last question -- how do you pronounce "Elul?"

    Emphasis on the "E" or the "lul," and is the "E" long or short, and "lul" pronounced "lull" or "lool?"

    Todd
     
  11. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

Share This Page