Question about framing interior walls

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Don Marsh, Jun 24, 2003.

  1. Don Marsh

    Don Marsh Extra

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    I'll be framing out my basement soon, and in reading some books, i've seen the use of using a 2x6" top and bottom pates with staggered 2x4" studs. Is this an efficient soundproofing method that is not too hard to do? Thanks!
     
  2. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    The theory behind that is to minimize contact between either side of the wall. That, in turn, minimizes the vibrations being transmitted from one space to another through the wall.

    You would only use this method for "inside" walls, however. Not anything that would go up against a masonry wall, for example.

    Whether it'll make a big difference in sound proofing the room, I find other things more problematic than "through wall" vibrations: air vents, door jambs. I guess it depends on how soundproof you want to be. It wouldn't make much sense to have a double sound proof wall with a hollow-core door in it, or a cold air return that runs to the bedroom upstairs.
     
  3. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Yes it is.

    However, don't expect miracles. The existing ceiling joists and cavities can conduct sound to other rooms in the basement - depending on their orientation. Low frequencies are especially difficult to contain. The concrete floor will actually transmit some bass as well. Also pay attention to doors, HVAC ducts, and even electrical outlets. Any opening can conduct sound. Doors are particularly important. Without special door treatment or a true "acoustic door", you will probably not get more than 30dB of attenuation.

    Don't get me wrong. Staggered-stud walls are a good idea... just don't forget the other details or you won't realize the benefit.
     
  4. Chip_Slattery

    Chip_Slattery Stunt Coordinator

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    Don,

    The exterior walls of my HT are all staggered-stud. Take a look at this page on my site for a few pics of the framing.
     
  5. Don Marsh

    Don Marsh Extra

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    Thanks everyone. It sounds that for the small amount of extra work required to frame this way, it's worth doing. I realize there are other factors at play here (i don't have a lot of the other issues mentioned), but i guess every bit helps. I'm not really going for 100% soundproofing anyway, i'm just trying to get the best bang for my buck and hard work.
     
  6. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Don,

    You can also create unbalanced walls that will greatly reduce sound transmission by using a double layer of drywall on every other wall. The second layer should be of a different thickness than the first.
     

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