Question about component input

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dan_ M, Sep 25, 2002.

  1. Dan_ M

    Dan_ M Auditioning

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    i just bought a TV and DVD player for the bedroom, the TV has component inputs for the DVD, do I have to spend the extra money for cables that are specifically for comp inputs or can I get 3 regular RCA cables.
    keep in mind, its a bedroom setup and doesnt have to be great quality.
     
  2. dave_brogli

    dave_brogli Screenwriter

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    Yeah you really do need the component cables, the composite chords from what I understand just dont work. I am sure someone else will chime in with all the specs.
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    pick up a set of component cables down at Target...GE's for 20 bucks i think.
     
  4. Dan_ M

    Dan_ M Auditioning

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    thank you for the help
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Component cables are simply 3 video cables cut to identical length and usually bundled together.

    "RCA Cables" have a convention:

    - Video cables are made with 75 ohm coax
    - Audio cables are OFTEN made with 75 ohm coax, but could be made with 50, 110, 300, etc.

    So you dont want to try using red/blue colored AUDIO cables for your video connection unless you feel lucky. (No, it wont hurt anything to try).

    The AR brand, or even Radio Shack make some nice, inexpensive cable sets which are great for short runs to smaller displays. Highly recommended.

    Good Luck.
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    You will probably get a full color picture even with the cheapest A/V cable set, using the yellow cable for the green jacks, red for Pr, and white for Pb. But there may or may not be degradation including ghosting and "chroma delay". The latter causes color to look misconverged. The chroma delay test pattern in Video Essentials has some upright red bars on a yellow background, chroma delay shows the bars displaced to the left or right leaving a black gap.
    You could also use three single video cables with RCA plugs at each end, be sure to label them Y, Pb, and Pr so you keep the connections matched. This is a surer shot than the A/V cable.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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