Quality analog A/V capture with post-cap H/W MPEG2 compression for <$500?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Marshall Brewton, Oct 9, 2003.

  1. Marshall Brewton

    Marshall Brewton Auditioning

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    I am looking for a video capture solution which can
    • capture analog video at 720x480
    • store the video as lossless DV
    • compress the previously captured DV to MPEG2 at (or close to) realtime
    • cost less than $500US.
    I really don't want a software compressor as I don't wish to wait several hours for a single hour of DV to be converted to MPEG2. As I wish to have the option of editing the captured video in such a way that doesn't introduce artifacts, I want to have MPEG2 encoding hardware available to compress the video post-capture.

    edit: I have found that the MPEGPro MVR does not capture to DV, so it's no longer an option.

    The only solution I have found that meets my criteria is the Canopus MPEGPRO MVR. Though Canopus is well respected in the video community and nary a negative word is spoken about their ADVC-100 A/D D/A video converter, I just wish I could find some substantive reviews of the hardware as opposed to re-worded press releases.

    Also, this is a no-frills card that has no DV input should I acquire such a video device in the future and hasn't a video output if the time comes that I wish to dump the results to tape. The former, I suppose, could be taken care of by a Firewire card and the latter by a cheap hardware DVD decoder. But that's two less card slots available in an already cramped case.


    The best solution, in theory, would be to find a dedicated MPEG2 hardware compression board for ~$230 and pair it with the aforementioned ADVC-100. Does such a beast exist?

    I would greatly appreciate any advice offered on this subject.
     
  2. David Broome

    David Broome Stunt Coordinator

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    I use the Canopis ADVC100 to capture to DV on the hard drive, do my editing, and then use CinemaCraft Encoder Basic. I generally get 1:1 or better encoding rates, on a P4 2.6 with 640 megs of ram. That would run you in the $350 range for that combo (assuming you have a firewire port). I know it doesn't meet your requirements (hardware), but just thought I'd let you know it qorks great for me. You may want to look over on DVDRHelp.com
     
  3. Marshall Brewton

    Marshall Brewton Auditioning

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    It now appears that I would have to pay >$800 for the dedicated hardware solution that I seek. I will, instead, shell out the extra cash to grab the ADVC-100 and then re-vamp my current system (a 1.33GHz T-Bird) to an overclocked Dual 2.4GHz Xeon-based system. Hopefully I should be able to attain speeds close to or at 3.0GHz according to the discussions I'm reading at 2CPU.com.

    Thanks for your reply.
     
  4. BenSC

    BenSC Stunt Coordinator

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    The Haughpage PVR-250 is an excelent choice. People in the linux community have been building "Tivo" like machines with these for a while. It's got built in hardware MPEG2 and takes in audio, so you don't have to worry about sync. The only thing it won't do is convert your old media. But, the best part is you can buy a version called the "freestyle" off ebay for $90. It has no software or manual, just a static bag, but you can download everything off Haughpage's site.
     

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